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LG to bundle G5 pre-orders with a free CAM Plus attachment

LG to bundle G5 pre-orders with a free CAM Plus attachment
LG to bundle G5 pre-orders with a free CAM Plus attachment
Pre-orders placed through from now until April 16 will receive a CAM Plus Friend module at no extra charge.

In what can be seen as a response to Samsung's successful Gear VR and Galaxy S7 bundle campaign, LG will be bundling its upcoming G5 flagship with lucrative extras as well. Those who pre-order the smartphone from select retailers from now until April 16th will also receive a free CAM Plus accessory to attach to the modular G5 for improved camera controls. The G5 itself will retail for just under 700 Euros and the CAM Plus attachment itself retails for 100 Euros separately.

The completely redesigned G5 features an always-on display and a full-metal chassis with a pull-out slot underneath for direct access to the 2800 mAh battery and for inserting optional accessories. LG is labeling these proprietary accessories as LG Friends, which can also be controlled via an in-house app.

The bundled LG CAM Plus can be connected to the G5 through the slot underneath. LG promises that the attachment will allow for more comfortable camera handling as it provides physical buttons for recording, stopping, zooming, and other basic camera functions. It even includes a secondary 1200 mAh battery for longer runtimes.

The bundle is available through Amazon, O2, Cyberport, Media Markt, Otto, Redcoon, Saturn, and Vodafone retailers.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 03 > LG to bundle G5 pre-orders with a free CAM Plus attachment
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-03-15 (Update: 2016-03-15)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.