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Intel has begun shipping Kaby Lake to manufacturers

Intel has begun shipping Kaby Lake to manufacturers
Intel has begun shipping Kaby Lake to manufacturers
The announcement was made through a conference call with investors. The first consumer models sporting the 7th generation CPU should be making their way to IDF 2016 and IFA 2016.

Intel is now finally at its final stages of launching its Kaby Lake CPU platform. As of June 2016, the chipmaker has begun mass production of its Skylake successor for OEM distribution to incorporate onto brand new notebooks and tablets. Thus, all there is left for Intel to do is to formally announce and introduce the 7th generation of Core ix SKUs at next month's IDF 2016 in San Francisco.

Kaby Lake is a refresh of Skylake and is manufactured in the same 14 nm lithography. Consumers will have to wait at least one more year for the 10 nm Cannon Lake series due to supposed manufacturing challenges. The chipmaker recently dropped its "tick-tock" development cycle for a much slower three-phase process. The company's latest financial earnings revealed stable sales YoY, but profits have been more than halved due to recent reorganization efforts.

It was previously rumored that the next generation of Surface Pro and Surface Book devices had been delayed to 2017 due to issues regarding the Kaby Lake platform. It remains to be seen if this will hold true now that the first batch of Kaby Lake processors are already on their way.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 07 > Intel has begun shipping Kaby Lake to manufacturers
Benjamin Herzig/ Allen Ngo, 2016-07-26 (Update: 2016-07-26)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.