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IBM Research builds the first functional 7 nm processor

Transistors processor technology roadmap
Transistors technology roadmap
The first 7 nm node test chips were built with GlobalFoundries, Samsung, and SUNY Polytechnic Institute's Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering.

IBM Research announced earlier today that it managed to build the world's first functional 7 nm node test chips. According to previous roadmaps unveiled by Intel, this technology is expected to hit the market in 2017. For now, these chips are only prototypes that IBM builds with partners GlobalFoundries, Samsung and SUNY Polytechnic Institute's Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering.

According to ZDNet, the Big Blue hopes these chips are "the beginning of smaller semiconductors that can carry on Moore's Law a bit more and ultimately power analytic workloads." Most processors on the market today use 14 nm to 22 nm technology, but 10 nm chips begin to gain market share as well.

IBM Research unveiled that the 7 nm chip has been built using Silicon Germanium (SiGe) channel transistors and Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Last year, the company uncovered R&D plans that involve a $3 billion budget over a period of five years.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 07 > IBM Research builds the first functional 7 nm processor
Codrut Nistor, 2015-07- 9 (Update: 2015-07- 9)
Codrut Nistor
Codrut Nistor - News Editor
Although I have been writing about new software and hardware for almost a decade, I consider myself to be old school. I always enjoy listening to music on CD or tape instead of digital files and I will not even get into the touchscreen vs physical keys debate. However, I also enjoy new technology, as I now have the chance to take a look at the future every day. I joined the Notebookcheck crew back in 2013 and I have no plans to leave the ship anytime soon.