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HTC Q4 2016 balance sheet shows an operating loss of over 110 million Euros

HTC Q4 2016 balance sheet shows an operating loss of over 110 million Euros
HTC Q4 2016 balance sheet shows an operating loss of over 110 million Euros
High loss and slumping sales will force HTC to drop budget smartphones altogether in the future.

Taiwanese manufacturer HTC will focus less on budget smartphones and more on high-end flagship devices moving forward not unlike Samsung or Apple. This is in response to poor smartphone sales throughout 2016 and an attempt to reposition the company as a mainstream to premium brand. The manufacturer is expected to launch just 7 new smartphones this year with the recent U Play and U Ultra being two of the small handful.

HTC's financial figures show a major drop in sales from 121.7 billion Taiwanese Dollars to just 78.2 billion Taiwanese Dollars (or the equivalent of 2.39 billion Euros). Revenue is still deep in the red at 10.58 billion Taiwanese Dollars (323.4 million Euros), although this is an improvement from 2015 where the company reported an even higher loss of 121.68 billion Taiwanese Dollars TWD.

Q4 2016 brought a turnover of 22.2 billion TWD or 3.5 billion less than in Q4 2015. It remains to be seen if HTC's smartphone efforts can top rising Chinese competitors like Huawei, Oppo, Vivo, and others. HTC VP Jason Mackenzie recently resigned after more than a decade with the company, so the manufacturer will have to reshuffle a few of its top ranking officers this year as well.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 02 > HTC Q4 2016 balance sheet shows an operating loss of over 110 million Euros
Allen Ngo, 2017-02-22 (Update: 2017-02-22)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.