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GripDockIt wireless charger lets you charge your smartphone with PopSockets and grips still attached

GripDockIt wireless charger lets you charge with PopSockets still attached (Source: GripDockIt)
GripDockIt wireless charger lets you charge with PopSockets still attached (Source: GripDockIt)
The 15 W wireless charger will launch before the end of the year for at least $40 USD. Early backers can pre-order the charger for a lower price of $26.
Allen Ngo,

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One of the best things about wireless charging is the convenience of not having to fumble around with USB cables. On the other hand, one of the most annoying things about wireless charging is that it doesn't always work with most phone cases or removable rear grips like PopSockets. GripDockIt addresses this disadvantage by incorporating a recess into its wireless stands so users won't need to remove the grips to charge.

This simple concept has apparently attracted enough backers on Kickstarter to fund the project 19 days earlier than expected. The GripDockIt charger promises compatibility with both Android and iPhone smartphones via Qi charging and a 15 W transmitter. The PopSocket or grip must be nonmetal, however, or else the charger will not work.

The manufacturer is promising a ship date of December 2020 for both its desktop wireless charger and in-car charger.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 02 > GripDockIt wireless charger lets you charge your smartphone with PopSockets and grips still attached
Allen Ngo, 2020-02-24 (Update: 2020-02-24)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.