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Google Nexus 6P is not easy to repair says iFixit

Google Nexus 6P is not easy to repair says iFixit
Google Nexus 6P is not easy to repair says iFixit
Turns out that the Huawei-produced Nexus 6P makes extensive use of adhesives for very difficult accessibility.

The Nexus 6P and 5X will soon reach buyers in the U.S. if not already. The 5.7-inch Nexus 6P is manufactured by Huawei and utilizes a WQHD AMOLED touchscreen (2560 x 1440). iFixit has already opened up the Nexus 6P to find out just how hard or easy it may be for the average joe to disassemble and reassemble the smartphone in case of damage or failure.

There's not much to complain about in terms of manufacturing quality or materials. Huawei has proven itself to be one of the world's largest smartphone makers in a relatively short amount of time. The manufacturer recently overtook Xiaomi as China's biggest smartphone provider.

Last week, iFixit tore apart the LG Nexus 5X and awarded it a repairability score of 7 out of 10. Thus, the 5X isn't necessarily difficult to take apart with some patience and a steady hand. In contrast, the Nexus 6P proved to be difficult due to its sensitive display and metal unibody. Attempting to separate the two can very easily crack the display and the copious amount of glue makes it more difficult to carefully break down the individual components. In the end, iFixit discourages users to attempt any self-repair guides and awards the Nexus 6P a repairability score of just 2 out of 10.

Competing models like the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus have scored 7 out of 10, while the LG G4 scored 8 out of 10. It says a lot about the Nexus 6P when even the latest iPhone can be considered easier to safely disassemble.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 10 > Google Nexus 6P is not easy to repair says iFixit
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-10-31 (Update: 2015-10-31)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.