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Samsung Galaxy S7 is harder to repair than its predecessor

Samsung Galaxy S7 iFixit.com teardown repairability score 3 out of 10
Samsung Galaxy S7 teardown
Notorious website iFixit.com awarded Samsung's latest flagship a repairability score of only 3/10 while its predecessor got 4/10.

Although many complained about the lack of microSD support in the Samsung Galaxy S6, at least iFixit has rated that flagship's repairability with a 4 out of 10 score. Unfortunately, while the Samsung Galaxy S7 has an excellent curved display, the world's first Dual Pixel smartphone camera, as well as a microSD slot, repairing it is quite a challenge.

After disassembling the Galaxy S7, iFixit ended up with these interesting findings regarding its innards:

  • there are no exterior screws, so the handset must be heated, and suction cups are required to remove the front and back glass
  • while most internal components are modular, accessing them is very difficult and usually ends up with a destroyed display
  • replacing the USB ports, which is usually the component most likely to break down, requires to remove the glass/display as well

In the end, it looks like the new Samsung Galaxy S7 is an excellent flagship - at least as long as it does not break down. Unfortunately, a rather usual repair like replacing the USB port might cost half the price of the brand new handset.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 03 > Samsung Galaxy S7 is harder to repair than its predecessor
Codrut Nistor, 2016-03- 9 (Update: 2016-03- 9)
Codrut Nistor
Codrut Nistor - News Editor
Although I have been writing about new software and hardware for almost a decade, I consider myself to be old school. I always enjoy listening to music on CD or tape instead of digital files and I will not even get into the touchscreen vs physical keys debate. However, I also enjoy new technology, as I now have the chance to take a look at the future every day. I joined the Notebookcheck crew back in 2013 and I have no plans to leave the ship anytime soon.