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First new version of ThrottleStop since April is now available

ThrottleStop in action. (Source: TechPowerup)
ThrottleStop in action. (Source: TechPowerup)
The first new version of ThrottleStop in nearly seven months is now available for download. In addition to the usual assortment of powerful configuration features it brings support for Apollo Lake, a new way to toggle mini mode, and the ability to hide the task area icon.

TechPowerup has released version 8.50 of ThrottleStop, the first update in nearly seven months. The main improvement is enabling initial support for Intel’s Goldmont architecture in Apollo Lake, the family which contains the mobile Celeron N3350 and N3450 as well as the mobile Pentium N4200 processors.

Those who prefer things to be minimalistic will be glad that they now can double-click to toggle mini mode on and off, and the option to disable the notification area icon which persistently shows as the programme runs in the background.

ThrottleStop is a programme for adjusting system metrics not ordinarily available to the user on most laptops, with typical usage being to lower mobile processor voltage to reduce thermal throttling. It is similar in functionality to Intel’s Extreme Tuning Utility (XTU) but is popular among enthusiasts who enjoy the powerful tweaking options and resource efficiency that ThrottleStop offers.

ThrottleStop 8.50 can be downloaded from TechPowerup at this link, and we have a detailed guide available on our site.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 11 > First new version of ThrottleStop since April is now available
Craig Ward, 2017-11- 3 (Update: 2017-11- 4)
Craig Ward
Craig Ward - News Editor
I grew up in a family surrounded by technology, starting with my father loading up games for me on a Commodore 64, and later on a 486. In the late 90's and early 00's I started learning how to tinker with Windows, while also playing around with Linux distributions, both of which gave me an interest for learning how to make software do what you want it to do, and modifying settings that aren't normally user accessible. After this I started building my own computers, and tearing laptops apart, which gave me an insight into hardware and how it works in a complete system. Now keeping up with the latest in hardware and software news is a passion of mine.