Notebookcheck

Elephone S7 Limited Edition with Helio X25 SoC on sale for the Holidays

Elephone S7 Limited Edition with Helio X25 SoC on sale for the Holidays
Elephone S7 Limited Edition with Helio X25 SoC on sale for the Holidays
The Galaxy S7 Edge clone just got a little faster and is now available for $250 USD.

Chinese manufacturer Elephone officially introduced its Elephone S7 in November and, perhaps unsurprisingly, the design is modeled to look similar to the Galaxy S7 Edge. While the original model launched with the MediaTek Helio X20 SoC, a newer Limited Edition SKU is coming with the slightly faster MediaTek Helio X25 SoC. Online retailer Gearbest will be offering the Elephone S7 Limited Edition in limited quantities for a price of $250 USD or just a few USD more than the original Elephone S7.

Multiple SKUs will be made available in multiple colors each with the Helio X25 SoC. The least expensive SKU will ship with 3 GB of RAM and 32 GB of internal storage while the pricier SKU will have 4 GB of RAM and 64 GB of storage.

As with most smartphones imported from China, buyers in the U.S. should be aware that the Elephone S7 may not support the proper LTE bands. It does, however, support LTE band 20 to be compatible with a handful of cellular networks across Europe.

The manufacturer also recently announced a 6-inch phablet with dual rear cameras for launch sometime next year.

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team! Indian citizens welcome!

Currently wanted: 
News and Editorial Editor - Details here

Source(s)

static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 12 > Elephone S7 Limited Edition with Helio X25 SoC on sale for the Holidays
Allen Ngo, 2016-12-27 (Update: 2016-12-27)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.