Notebookcheck

CES 2017 | Dell announces Precision 7720 with Pascal Quadro GPUs

Dell announces Precision 7720 with Pascal GPUs
Dell announces Precision 7720 with Pascal GPUs
The manufacturer has revealed Pascal-based Quadro workstations for launch next month ahead of Nvidia's own next generation Quadro announcement.

One of the biggest gaps in products since the launches of Kaby Lake and Pascal were the workstations. Now that quad-core Kaby Lake Xeon processors have been announced, it's expected that Nvidia will reveal the Pascal PxxxM Quadro GPUs very soon for workstations.

Major manufacturers like HP and Lenovo have yet to update the ZBook and ThinkPad P/W series, respectively, due to the lack of any new Quadro announcements as of late. Dell, however, looks to be the first out the door with a mobile workstation sporting both Kaby Lake and Pascal. Called the Precision 7720, the workstation refresh was leaked earlier this week and this one in particular will be the successor to the Precision 7710. Since Nvidia has yet to officially reveal the Pascal Quadro series, however, Dell has not specified the exact Quadro model options in the new refresh. The new SKU will also come with AMD options likely at a lower starting price.

Dell will launch the new Precision 7720 this February 28th meaning that Nvidia is expected to make the next generation Quadro series official sometime before then.

The Alienware and Inspiron series are also being updated with Pascal GPUs this year.

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team! Especially English native speakers welcome!

Currently wanted: 
News and Editorial Editor - Details here

Source(s)

static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 01 > Dell announces Precision 7720 with Pascal Quadro GPUs
Allen Ngo, 2017-01- 8 (Update: 2017-01- 8)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.