Notebookcheck

Review Sony Vaio VPC-S11M1E Notebook

by Sebastian Jentsch 02/18/2010

Snow White Office

A solidly built office notebook with good input devices is being sold for 899 euro. The new S range is the predecessor of the ceased SR series and is supposed to especially satisfy office fans. Sony combined the smallest Arrandale processor, i3-330 and Nvidia's 310M graphics. If these key numbers are sufficient for a 13 inch all-rounder will be shown in our comprehensive review.

Sony Vaio VPC-S11M1E with an Intel Core i3-330M. A 13.3 inch business all-rounder?
Sony Vaio VPC-S11M1E Notebook

The legacy of the SR range. Sony divides the old SR range into an S and a Y series in the new Vaio notebook line-up. Both are 13.3 inchers, which either address lifestyle inclined business people (S range) or mobility driven consumers (Y series). The currently only model of the Y range, VPC-Y11S1E/S.G4 is also equipped with an ultra low voltage processor (Intel's Core 2 Duo processor, SU7300) and lacks an optical drive.

The S range model facing us (VPC S11M1E/W.G4 white) doesn't take it quite so tight with energy savings. Intel's Core i3-330M processor beside a 320 GB hard disk and an Nvidia GeForce 310M create the new series' minimum configuration. The bigger relations, VPC-S11X9E/B.G4 and VPC-S11V9E/B.G4, differ from each other mainly by a HSUPA module (7.2 / 5.76 Mbit/s), a 500 GB hard disk and sometimes a Core i5-520M CPU.

How much mobility, entertainment and frequent typist joy will the user receive from the 899 euro (MRSP) expensive basic configuration? What good is the dedicated Nvidia GeForce 310M? Might it suffice for simple or older games? All answers are here in this review.

Case

Sony has sent us a 1973 gram light 13.3 incher into the office. The case has an adequate torsional stiffness for mobile intentions. The wrist-rest impresses with a high firmness and doesn't bend anywhere. A typical Sony trait can be seen in the inserted battery at the back: it wobbles obviously in its lock. The battery clatters constantly when carried around and reminds us that it's there.

The surfaces above the keys and the base plate areas sit tight and don't bend anywhere, even under stronger pressure. The aluminum-magnesium alloy, of which the base plate is made, has a positive effect here. The material is stiff, light and looks high-end because of the hard, metallic surface appearance.

In our opinion, the lid is adequately stiff in view of its slim design. We can only twist the lid by a few degrees when it is picked up at the corners. Slight pressure on the display surface didn't provoke instant deformations. Both hinges, where the display is mounted, are a bit loose. But the display stays securely in every position, anyway. The lid teeters a bit under jolts, as they partly turn up in train or car journeys.

Sony has done a good job with the aluminum lid surface. This naturally can't be recognized as such, because it has a white finish. The light-colored surface is smooth and matt. The aluminum is discontinued by plastic on the front side of the lid where the hands are placed to open it. This surface is insensitive to scratches.

The work area's surface is well suitable as a work machine. Sony has forgone on any kind of glossy surface. The matt silver with the very striking white keys create a pleasantly sober contrast.

VPC-S11M1E view
VPC-S11M1E view
VPC-S11M1E power on
VPC-S11M1E power on
Base plate material
Base plate material
VPC-S11M1E bottom
VPC-S11M1E bottom

Connectivity

i.Link/IEEE 1394 is also onboard
i.Link/IEEE 1394 is also onboard
Docking port for the VGP-PRS10
Docking port for the VGP-PRS10

Sony uses the whole available range of connections. The 13.3 incher has a DVD drive, which is why only a limited place is available. We find all connections on the right, left or front. The rear is completely reserved for the battery pack.

The port distribution seems sensible: VGA right beside the HDMI on the left. Thus, no thick cables impede using a righty mouse. Lefties are at a disadvantage because HDMI, VGA and FireWire port obstruct the place at the wrist-rest's left. This of course is only the case when cables are connected there. It could get a bit tight on the right when users connect a broad USB stick there. The optical drive's tray can't be opened anymore when we insert a USB surf stick, for example.

Cardreader (SD and HG duo) as well as the audio ports are found in the front area. As for every notebook, connections on the rear would have been better for the use at the home desk. The mounting of a deep ingrained display wouldn't have been possible then.

Front: 2 cardreaders, audio, WLAN switch
Front: 2 cardreaders, audio, WLAN switch
Left: HDMI, VGA, USB, i.Link
Left: HDMI, VGA, USB, i.Link
Rear: no connections
Rear: no connections
Right: 2x USB, Ethernet
Right: 2x USB, Ethernet

The VPCS11M1E/W is equipped with a docking port on its bottom. The VGP-PRS10 docking station can be connected here. This base station replicates the connections and prevents a cable snarl on the desk. Users don't have to connect their peripherals bit by bit to the S11 anymore. The VGP-PRS10 costs 170 to 200 euro. It makes the S11's adapter unnecessary and adds 4 USB, an RJ-45 (LAN), a VGA (D-Sub) and a DVI port (24 pin).

Input Devices

Keyboard

Sony has a well made keyboard implanted in the VPC-S11M1E/W. The keys in an isolated look have a big gap to the neighbor and have firm ground on almost the entire surface. The keyboard only bends a bit on the level of the enter key, so over the optical drive. We find the pressure point and stroke length very good. This keyboard can be recommended to frequent typists.

Touchpad

The touchpad is on almost the same level as the wrist-rest. The cursor moves precisely over the desktop when we glide over its smooth surface. A narrow ledge separates the sensitive surface from the wrist-rest. It's just palpable enough to feel the touch surface with closed eyes. The pad can't be disabled via a FN key. It is a multi-touch pad (Synaptics V7.4). It recognizes the use of two fingers, making two finger gestures possible. So the user can, for example, zoom in and out of Word documents or scroll up and down. If you don't like gesture recognition, you can disable the multi-touch properties.

Keyboard with detached keys
Keyboard with detached keys
and a good feedback
and a good feedback
Touchpad with gesture recognition
Touchpad with gesture recognition

Display

Small color space
Small color space

Sony builds in a 13.3 inch display (33.8 cm) with a resolution of 1366x768 pixels (16:9). The reflective screen (type unknown) can't convince us. The brightness is average, the contrasts are poor and the color space is very small.

The resolution is adequate for its application field. The 13.3 inch TFT is too small for permanent office work with several windows. Two windows with a lot of content only fit beside each other with difficulty. The black value of 0.96 cd/m2 results from a contrast of 203:1. A higher contrast would mean more vivid colors. Colors look rather more faint and pallid than crisp and fresh. However, the glare display deceives the eye and gives the colors a certain amount of brilliance back.

190
cd/m²
191
cd/m²
188
cd/m²
194
cd/m²
195
cd/m²
196
cd/m²
197
cd/m²
200
cd/m²
195
cd/m²
Distribution of brightness
Information
Maximum: 200 cd/m²
Average: 194 cd/m²
Brightness Distribution: 94 %
Center on Battery: 195 cd/m²
Black: 0.96 cd/m²
Contrast: 203:1
Glare Type TFT
Glare Type TFT

We measured an average of 194 cd/m2. Our Gossen meter records a luminosity of 200 cd/m2 in the lower center row. Just in view of the reflective screen, a luminosity beyond 230 cd/m2 would have been desirable. But this way, a stress-free use in sunlight is barely possible. The notebook doesn't reduce the brightness in battery mode.

A light sensor, as already in the 16.4 inch Vaio F11, is also in the Vaio S11. We disabled the sensor via the Vaio Control Center (not the Assist key!) for the measurements. The sensor adjusts the screen's brightness to the room's light conditions. Every automatically set luminosity is pleasant. Users can't turn the brightness higher than as the sensor indicates when the automatic is enabled. It can only be turned down via FN-F5.

Outdoors
Outdoors
Reflections
Reflections

The 13.3 inch TFT isn't a suitable companion for the balcony or roof garden with its reflective texture. We can only recognize a very dark image from a frontal position already under clouds. This effect is enhanced in bright sunlight. We can barely recognize any colors or writing from a side position. Thus, working with the S11 in sunlight is only possible with the greatest effort.

The horizontal viewing angles are fairly adequate. We can read writing up to a deviation of about 45 degrees from the optimal position. But up to there, the image has already evidently dimmed. Dimming already sets in at a deviation of 25 degrees from the center.

The displayed writing remains readable to about 40 degrees when our view strays downwards (vertical). The colors already inverse obviously at 10 degrees. The brightness reacts similarly; it dims evidently at about 10 degrees.

Viewing angles Sony Vaio VPC-S11M1E
Viewing angles Sony Vaio VPC-S11M1E

Performance

The Intel Core i3-330M processor belongs to Intel's weakest Arrandale processors with 2 x 2.13 GHz. The TDP is, as in the related model i3-350M (2.26 GHZ), 35 watts. So it's not an energy savings ULV CPU as they are, for example, used in Acer's Timeline series or Asus' UL series. The i3-330M has an integrated IGP graphic unit, just like the stronger i5-520M. The Intel HD has been, however, disabled by the OEM supplier. The image is rendered by a dedicated Nvidia GeForce 310M (512 MB GDDR3) instead.

A feature of the Arrendale processors is hyperthreading (HT). All Core ix's have this property. HT provides every physical core with a virtual core as support. Thus the dual-core Core i3 can compute with a total of 4 threads. The Core 2 Duo predecessors (Penryn) weren't capable of hyperthreading.

The Core i3-330M is supported by a 4096 MB DDR3 RAM (maximum 8 GB). This capacity is on two modules and can be used optimally by Windows 7 64 bit.

CPUZ CPU
System info CPUZ CPU
CPUZ Cache
System info CPUZ Cache
CPUZ Mainboard
System info CPUZ Mainboard
CPUZ RAM
System info CPUZ RAM
CPUZ RAM SPD
System info CPUZ RAM SPD
GPUZ
System info GPUZ
HDTune
System info HDTune
System information Sony Vaio VPC-S11M1E
Cinebench R10 benefits from four threads
Cinebench R10 benefits from four threads
A sticker indicates Core i3
A sticker indicates Core i3

The Vaio VPC-S11M1E with a Core i3-330M (2.13 GHz) is able to compete with many of the Penryn predecessor generation processors. A difference must be made between multi-core and single-core computing. If applications or game only use one or two cores, then the i3-330M is at a disadvantage due to its low clock rate.

The i3-330M is at the same level as a Core 2 Duo T9500 (2.6 GHz) or even with a P880 (2.66 GHz) in multi-core computing. See the Cinebench R10 graph. Intel's hyperthreading sets two additional virtual cores in motion, from which multi-core applications benefit.

The i3-320M has to accept harsh losses in single core computing. The computing rate is only slight that of a T6600 (2.20 GHz, i.e. Fujitsu Amilo Pi 3660) or a P7450 (2.13 GHz, i.e. Samsung Q320). Even a Pentium T4300 with a clock rate of 2.1 GHz (i.e. Packard Bell EasyNote TJ65) computes slightly faster.

DPC Latency Checker
DPC Latency Checker Sony Vaio VPC-S11M1E

Latencies are delays that can turn up in interaction of internal devices. If these are too high, it can come to problems when external devices are connected (e.g. sound crackling with external sound cards or short interruptions in real time audio). The rates of the S11 are continuously a bit below 4000µs when the hard disk and programs are active. The cause for this is erroneous drivers of internal devices, such as the WLAN adapter, sound card, USB host controller or others. Disabling these one at a time can reveal the faulty driver.

Cinebench R10 Shading 32Bit
3045
Cinebench R10 Rendering Multiple CPUs 32Bit
5411
Cinebench R10 Rendering Single 32Bit
2331
Cinebench R10 Rendering Single CPUs 64Bit
2865 Points
Cinebench R10 Rendering Multiple CPUs 64Bit
6583 Points
Cinebench R10 Shading 64Bit
3008 Points
Help
PC Mark
PCMark Vantage5156 points
Help
PCMark Vantage in comparison
Sony SV-S1311G4E (min)
 2350M, HD Graphics 3000
811
   ...
HP EliteBook 2540p
 640LM, Graphics Media Accelerator (GMA) HD Graphics
5149
Sony Vaio VPC-S11M1E
 330M, GeForce 310M
5156
HP ProBook 6540b WD690EA
 430M, Mobility Radeon HD 4550
5158
   ...
One K56-3F (max)
 4700MQ, GeForce GT 750M
23558
4.9
Windows 7 Experience Index
Processor
Calculations per second
6.2
Memory (RAM)
Memory operations per second
5.9
Graphics
Desktop performance for Windows Aero
4.9
Gaming graphics
3D business and gaming graphics
6
Primary hard disk
Disk data transfer rate
5.5

PCMark Vantage establishes a system performance of 5156 points. All components, starting with the processor up to the RAM, are assessed in this benchmark. The PCMark Vantage graph shows that the Vaio S11 with an i3-330M supplies the same application rate as an Asus G72GX.

This statement is irritating because the Asus gamer is equipped with a Penryn Quad-Core Q9000 and a strong GeForce GPU. But let it be said that the PCMark Vantage barely rates the GTX 260M's high performance and is impressed by the i3's multi-threading. This is also why PCMark's rating of the little all-rounder comes dangerously close to an Alienware M17x (QX9300, GeForce GTX 280M SLI).

The Vaio S11 isn't an exception though. Other 13 laptops, such as Acer's Aspire 8942G-334G64Mn (Mobility Radeon HD 5650), reach a similarly high rating with 4655 PCMarks.

3D Mark
3DMark 2001SE19488 points
3DMark 06
 1280x1024
3223 points
3DMark Vantage1131 points
Help
320 GB - 5400 rpm
Transfer Rate Minimum: 19.5 MB/s
Transfer Rate Maximum: 70.7 MB/s
Transfer Rate Average: 51.8 MB/s
Access Time: 18.9 ms
Burst Rate: 62.2 MB/s
CPU Usage: 1 %

The Toshiba HDD (type MK3263GSX) with 320 GBytes works with a common revolution velocity of 5400 rpm. HDTune established an average rate of 51.8 MB per second in sequential read. This data throughput is under average. The 1200 euro expensive sister model, VPC-S11V9E/B, has a 500 GB hard disk. The SATA hard disk is always audible because of the write and read heads slight clacking during operation. The noise doesn't have a disturbing character though, but rather reminds placidly of the HDD's activity.

Gaming Performance

Wie wir testen - Leistung

The Nvidia GeForce 310M graphic card can access 512 MB DDR3 and is categorized as a starter GPU. The performance should be the same as the GeForce G 210M because of the identical core rate (625 MHz). The built-in DDR3 memory has a clock rate of 790 GHz.

The GPU isn't only built into the case for games but also for supporting the processor. The graphic chip (PureVideo HD) can take over HD decoding (H.264, MPEG-2, MPEG-4 etc.) just as well as video coding (CUDA, DirectX Compute und OpenGL).

The GPU is capable of DirectX 10.1 effects but not of PhysX. The latter wouldn't be used due to the lacking performance anyway. We established a weak 3223 points in 3DMark06.

Even if the negative rating is obvious for gaming, we couldn't resist playing Risen and Anno 1404. As expected, Anno 1404 only runs smoothly in the lowest settings (89 fps, 1.024x768). The frames drop without mercy to 11 fps in high details. The fantasy adventure, Risen, even only reaches 31 fps (800x600, low details). Thus, demanding gamers can bid well to the GeForce 310M.

Risen
 ResolutionSettingsValue
 1366x768all on/high, 4xAF9.78 fps
 1024x768all on/med, 2xAF14.28 fps
 800x600all off/low, 0xAF31.16 fps
Anno 1404
 ResolutionSettingsValue
 1280x1024very high, 0AA, 4AF10.75 fps
 1024x768low, 0AA, 0AF89.38 fps

Emissions

Louver
Louver

System Noise

The system noise presents itself from its best side. The 13.3 incher stays invariably quiet with an almost constant 31.2 dB(A). You won't be bothered by the low turning fan if you only type a bit in Word and check your emails. The cooling can attract attention with 37.8 d(B)A when the i3 processor and Nvidia graphics are put under load.  We didn't determine this maximum volume during the gaming tests (35.2 dB(A)), but only in a test situation with Furmark and Prime95 (stress test of two hours).

This doesn't daunt our impression of the ergonomics. Users may not receive a silent office notebook, but no one has to fear volumes beyond 35.2 dB(A) in regular use. The fan emits warm waste heat over a vent on the case's left rear.

Noise Level

Idle 30,6 / 30,6 / 31,6 dB(A)
HDD 31,1 dB(A)
DVD 34,1 / dB(A)
Load 35,2 / 37,8 dB(A)
 
    30 dB
silent
40 dB
audible
50 dB
loud
 
min: , med: , max:     (15 cm distance)
Stress test: CPU max. 74 degrees
Stress test: CPU max. 74 degrees

Temperature

The S11 prototype also has positive characteristics in terms of waste heat. The waste heat peaks are merely 33.6 degrees Celsius on the surfaces. In this case, the wrist-rests are almost cold with 23 to 27 degrees Celsius. We could also only create these temperatures in an unrealistic stress test.

In view of the temperature graph might be surprising. The temperatures under load are partly lower than in idle. For example, this applies to the wrist-rest. The reason: The active fan often shuts down in idle and the warm air can accumulate in the case. Thus, even areas get comparatively warm that don't have either the processor or the graphics in the vicinity. When the fan turns on, it trades warm air for cool air, whereby barely any new heat develops.

Single areas merely get luke warm in idle and office use, a scenario that suits the Vaio S11 most. We measured a maximum of 29 degrees in the area above the louver on the work surface. The bottom gets selectively warmer, our thermometer records 35.5 degrees.

What does it look like inside? Our stress test wasn't able to bring the Intel Core i3-330M to over 74 degrees Celsius. When the i3 CPU is bored, the CPU temperature is almost constantly at 40 degrees Celsius.

Max. Load
 30,8 °C29,1 °C24,7 °C 
 31,6 °C29,5 °C24,3 °C 
 26 °C27 °C22,7 °C 
Maximum: 31,6 °C
Average: 26.9 °C
23,3 °C29,8 °C33,6 °C
24,3 °C26,6 °C30,4 °C
24,2 °C25,1 °C26,2 °C
Maximum: 33,6 °C
Average: 26.7 °C
Power Supply (max.)  46,6 °C | Room Temperature 19,5 °C

Loudspeakers

The stereo loudspeakers placed above the keys supply an unsatisfactory sound, as they have a tendency for high pitches. Basses are lacking completely. Thus the sound isn't inviting for permanent listening to your favorite band. The sound enhancements in the system control don't help much either, the loudspeakers barely respond to optimizations trials. The volume is comparatively low in the highest volume setting. At least, it contortions or scratching in the small membrane don't turn up in high volumes.

Connecting external loudspeakers over a 3.5 millimeter jack plug cable is helpful. The level attached to the notebook can be increased as desired, whereas it doesn't come to a hissing even in very low input levels.

Battery Life

DVD-Test
DVD-Test
Reader-Test
Reader-Test

The expected battery life comes very close to our WLAN surfing test. The battery is drained after two and a half hours because we visited blinking news portals and downloaded a few files. The LED screen ran at a bit over 100 cd/m2 during this test. How long can users relax, watching a DVD movie? Our Lord of the Rings movie fun was put to an end after a good three hours (187 minutes)

If you use the Vaio S11 for video decoding or permanently pack files in zip files, you can count with only one hour of runtime. This is the minimum runtime established by BatteryEater's Classic test. The maximum battery life (idle) is a significantly longer five hours. User won't barely ever reach these because the CPU stayed in idle, there was almost nothing to be seen on the screen (lowest brightness) and WLAN/Bluetooth were disabled.

Battery Runtime
Idle (without WLAN, min brightness)
5h 08min
WiFi Surfing
2h 27min
DVD
3h 07min
Load (maximum brightness)
1h 00min

The 13.3 incher's power consumption is agreeably low, especially in idle mode. We recorded 11.7 to 17.4 watts (depending on brightness and active wireless modules). Our multimeter showed an average efficient power of 64.8 watts under maximum load in a stress test. The realistic power consumption, without battery charging, is between 14 watts (idle) and 41 watts (3DMark2006).

Power Consumption

Off / Standby 0,4 / 0,9 Watt
Idle 11.7 / 14 / 17,4 Watt
Load 41,1 / 64,8 Watt
 
Key: min: , med: , max:         

Verdict

Vaio VPC-S11M1E/W with a glare-type TFT
Vaio VPC-S11M1E/W with a glare-type TFT

The Sony Vaio VPC-S11M1E/W is at the starting line with the pretension to provide business people with a small 13.3 inch all-rounder. In our opinion, this aim has been majorly achieved, whereas the contrast poor glare display doesn't fit in.

The Vaio S11 can't be described as mobile in view of battery life. Two and a half hours of WLAN surfing isn't quite up to date in times of Intel's inexpensive CULV processors and 9 hour netbooks. Nevertheless, the user receives a significantly better system performance, driven by the i3-330M CPU's high performance, as compensation. In a simplified summary, the Core i3-330M (2.13 GHz) is better than the Core 2 Duo predecessor with the same or a somewhat higher clock rate in terms of performance. The reason is Intel's hyperthreading. However, the i3-330M is at a disadvantage in single-core applications in opposition to Core 2 Duo predecessors with the same or slightly lower clock rate.

The magnesium/plastic case (two kilograms) is light but nevertheless stable. The matt surfaces are very well suitable for serious office use. We, the testers, consider the reflective and too dark LED display as interfering for the Vaio S11's office claim. The 1366x768 pixels gleam with an average of only 194 cd/m2. A considerably brighter anti-glare display would have been necessary for a stress-free use on the park bench or in a cafe. The TFT's small color space and the low viewing angels aren't perfect for office use, but bearable.

The Vaio S11 can be best compared to the Samsung Q320 (13.4 inch, P7450) or the HP EliteBook 6930p (14.1 inch, T9400). Both have a business suitable look but are still equipped with the CPU predecessor generation, Core 2 Duo. The EliteBook is more expensive, but has a matt display (1280x800. If you want a lot more mobile, you could take the HP ProBook 5310m. A considerably longer battery life is possible with the alternative equipped with an ultra low voltage processor and UMTS.

Sony Vaio VPC-S11M1E Weiße Tarnung für den Winter
Sony Vaio VPC-S11M1E Weiße Tarnung für den Winter
In Review: Sony Vaio VPC-S11M1E
In Review:  Sony Vaio VPC-S11M1E

Specifications

Sony Vaio VPC-S11M1E
Processor
Graphics adapter
NVIDIA GeForce 310M - 512 MB, Core: 625 MHz, Memory: 790 MHz, DDR3, 187.83
Memory
4096 MB 
, DDR3 SDRAM
Display
13.3 inch 16:9, 1366x768 pixel, glossy: yes
Mainboard
Intel HM55
Harddisk
320 GB - 5400 rpm, 320 GB 
5400 rpm TOSHIBA MK3263GSX
Soundcard
Nvidia GT218 High Definition Audio Controller
Connections
3 USB 2.0, 1 Firewire, 1 VGA, 1 HDMI, 1 Kensington Lock, 1 Docking Station Port, Audio Connections: Line-out, mic, Card Reader: SD, HG-Duo,
Networking
Atheros AR8131 PCI-E Gigabit Ethernet Controller (10MBit), Intel Centrino Advanced-N 6200 AGN (a b g n ), Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR Bluetooth
Optical drive
Optiarc DVD RW AD-7930H
Size
height x width x depth (in mm): 31.5 x 329 x 228.5 ( = 1.24 x 12.95 x 9 in)
Weight
1.973 kg ( = 69.6 oz) Power Supply: 313 g ( = 11.04 oz)
Battery
54 Wh Lithium-Ion, VGP-BPS21A
Operating System
Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64 Bit
Additional features
Webcam: 1.3 MP, 24 Months Warranty

 

[+] compare
The Sony Vaio VPC-S11M1E is a 13.3 incher
The Sony Vaio VPC-S11M1E is a 13.3 incher
The battery can be removed,
The battery can be removed,
as soon as the lock is opened.
as soon as the lock is opened.
The power button is nice to look at. Red for standby, green for on.
The power button is nice to look at. Red for standby, green for on.
Hardware upgrading is also possible.
Hardware upgrading is also possible.
The S11 has a 320 GB Toshiba HDD.
The S11 has a 320 GB Toshiba HDD.
Upgrading the HDD is easily accomplished.
Upgrading the HDD is easily accomplished.
The two DDR3 RAM bases
The two DDR3 RAM bases
are already occupied by 2 x 2 GB, though.
are already occupied by 2 x 2 GB, though.
We can see the processor base through the RAM slot.
We can see the processor base through the RAM slot.
Not only instructions fall out of the box
Not only instructions fall out of the box
but also the 90 watt adapter.
but also the 90 watt adapter.
Vaio details are also found on it.
Vaio details are also found on it.
The battery weighs 313 grams
The battery weighs 313 grams
and has a capacity of 54 watt hours.
and has a capacity of 54 watt hours.
the created hole isn't striking.
the created hole isn't striking.
If the battery is to be removed permanently,
If the battery is to be removed permanently,
It's been covered by a grippy perforation.
It's been covered by a grippy perforation.
with a Core 13-330M and Nvidia graphics
with a Core 13-330M and Nvidia graphics
The case made of a magnesium alloy proves to be stable
The case made of a magnesium alloy proves to be stable
and the work surface only has matt finish.
and the work surface only has matt finish.
Office users are to be addressed with this.
Office users are to be addressed with this.
Sony even supplies i.Link and HDMI in the connectivity.
Sony even supplies i.Link and HDMI in the connectivity.
The front has a WLAN switch and audio ports.
The front has a WLAN switch and audio ports.
We also find two cardreaders: SD & HG Duo (Sony)
We also find two cardreaders: SD & HG Duo (Sony)
The eject key for the DVD drive (left) opens the tray.
The eject key for the DVD drive (left) opens the tray.
Details give the Vaio S11 a high-end look. A plastic scratch-protection here,
Details give the Vaio S11 a high-end look. A plastic scratch-protection here,
a submerged hinge there,
a submerged hinge there,
keys embedded with care here
keys embedded with care here
and a monochrome material mix there.
and a monochrome material mix there.
The webcam isn't a special feature of the Vaio S11,
The webcam isn't a special feature of the Vaio S11,
but the elevated wrist-rest is.
but the elevated wrist-rest is.
It can only supply the 13.3 incher with up to 2.5 hours of WLAN surfing.
It can only supply the 13.3 incher with up to 2.5 hours of WLAN surfing.

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Pro

+Cool and quiet
+Good application performance
+Light and stable
+Keyboard has a good feedback
+FireWire port
 

Cons

-Low viewing angles
-Low contrast
-Battery recharging takes a long time

Shortcut

What we liked

High versatile performance in a cool and quite case. Also, great input devices with a high-end look.

What we missed

An anti-glare display would have been the icing on the S11. But this way, the S11 remains unsuitable for outdoor use.

What surprised us

Why does Sony use such a color and viewing angle weak display? A few euro more wouldn't have made a big difference at a price of 899 euro (MRSP).

The competitors

Currently, there aren't any 13.3 inchers with a Core i3 CPU by the competitors. Small all-rounders are Samsung's Q320 (13.4 inch) and HP's EliteBook 6930p (14.1 inch).

Rating

Sony Vaio VPC-S11M1E
02/18/2010
Sebastian Jentsch

Chassis
86%
Keyboard
90%
Pointing Device
90%
Connectivity
80%
Weight
86%
Battery
77%
Display
70%
Games Performance
74%
Application Performance
92%
Temperature
91%
Noise
96%
Add Points
88%
Average
85%
86%
Office *
Weighted Average
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > Reviews > Archive of our own reviews > Review Sony Vaio VPC-S11M1E Notebook
Author: Sebastian Jentsch, 2010-02-27 (Update: 2013-06- 6)