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Specs leak for upcoming entry-level Intel June Canyon NUC, supports two 4k displays at 60 Hz

One of Intel's previous NUC designs. (Source: Intel)
One of Intel's previous NUC designs. (Source: Intel)
A technical specification document has shown up on Intel's website laying out the specifications and internal design of the upcoming June Canyon NUCs. The CPU and wireless card are soldered on, but the RAM and storage are upgradeable on two of the models.

Intel’s group of NUC (Next Unit of Computing) devices are an interesting category of ultra-small form factor devices that started with budget level processors in the Sandy Bridge series. In the last few generations, we have begun to see some truly powerful machines in the line-up, in particular, the Skull Canyon NUC with i7 CPU and now the newer Hades Canyon with AMD Vega graphics. But these are significantly more expensive than the Celeron and Pentium powered options which ushered the concept of the NUC into existence. 

An anonymous reader has sent us a link to a technical specification PDF stored on Intel’s website that is intended for vendors, system integrators, and engineers that shows the NUC7CJY and NUC7PJY, which are equipped with Celeron and Pentium CPUs respectively. The CPU and Wireless cards are soldered on, but the RAM and storage are upgradeable on the two models that come as barebones systems.

It is interesting to see that they come with 2 x HDMI 2.0a, showing that Intel is hoping these will be used for scenarios where an affordable and compact computer is needed for displaying content on TV screens. (Note: While both HDMI 2.0 ports are capable of 4k at 60 Hz, the spec sheets for the J4005 and J5005 don't specify whether they can handle a second 4k/60Hz monitor). Additionally, they are also plenty powerful enough for most general-use office computers and dumb-terminals, so the onboard graphics should handle the high-resolution output of office applications just fine.

 

Intel NUC7CJYIntel NUC7PJY
Processor

Celeron J4005 2.0/2.7 GHz 
2C/2T - 10 W TDP

Pentium J5005 1.5/2.8 GHz
4C/4T - 10 W TDP
RAMUp to 8 GB DDR2400
(NUC7CJYS supplied with 4 GB)
Up to 8 GB DDR2400
GraphicsHD 600HD 605
Storage1 x 2.5-inch bay
1 x SD Card slot
(NUC7CJYS supplied with 32 GB eMMC)
1 x 2.5-inch bay
1 x SD Card slot
I/O Connectivity2 x HDMI 2.0a (4k @ 60 Hz)
2 x USB3 (front)
2 x USB3 (rear)
1 x Infrared (IR)
1 x 1000 Mbps LAN
2 x HDMI 2.0a (4k @ 60 Hz)
2 x USB3 (front)
2 x USB3 (rear)
1 x Infrared (IR)
1 x 1000 Mbps LAN
Wireless802.11ac 1x1
Bluetooth 5
802.11ac 1x1
Bluetooth 5
Operating SystemUser supplied
(NUC7CJYS supplied with Windows 10 Home)
User supplied
Intel June Canyon NUC front panel layout. (Source: Intel)
Intel June Canyon NUC front panel layout. (Source: Intel)
Intel June Canyon NUC rear panel layout. (Source: Intel)
Intel June Canyon NUC rear panel layout. (Source: Intel)
Intel June Canyon NUC cooling layout. (Source: Intel)
Intel June Canyon NUC cooling layout. (Source: Intel)
Intel June Canyon NUC internal layout. (Source: Intel)
Intel June Canyon NUC internal layout. (Source: Intel)
Intel June Canyon NUC internal layout guide. (Source: Intel)
Intel June Canyon NUC internal layout guide. (Source: Intel)
 

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2018 01 > Specs leak for upcoming entry-level Intel June Canyon NUC, supports two 4k displays at 60 Hz
Craig Ward, 2018-01-31 (Update: 2018-02- 1)
Craig Ward
Craig Ward - News Editor
I grew up in a family surrounded by technology, starting with my father loading up games for me on a Commodore 64, and later on a 486. In the late 90's and early 00's I started learning how to tinker with Windows, while also playing around with Linux distributions, both of which gave me an interest for learning how to make software do what you want it to do, and modifying settings that aren't normally user accessible. After this I started building my own computers, and tearing laptops apart, which gave me an insight into hardware and how it works in a complete system. Now keeping up with the latest in hardware and software news is a passion of mine.