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Sony Xperia X gets a detailed teardown

Sony Xperia X gets a detailed teardown
Sony Xperia X gets a detailed teardown
Sony Mobile breaks down the Xperia X to show off unique camera features and other core components.

Sony unveiled its new brand of Xperia X smartphones at MWC 2016 with rumors of an Xperia X, Xperia XA, and Xperia X Performance family of devices. The latest rumor adds a fourth model to the list with the supposed Xperia X Premium, which could come equipped with an "HDR" display. Exact plans from Sony Mobile, however, are still under wraps and not official.

An official teardown of the Xperia X from Sony outlines nearly all the key components of the smartphone including its 143 x 69 x 7.7 mm dimensions, 150 g weight, and 5-inch Triluminos FHD display. The two integrated cameras are also highlights with the 13 MP front-facing Exmor RS camera and wide-angle f/2.0 22 mm lens and the 23 MP 1/2.3" rear camera. The rear camera in particular is equipped with a predictive hybrid auto-focus system and a Clear Image zoom with a wide-angle f/2.0 24 mm lens. Sony is promising very good shots with the  camera even in low-light conditions.

Other new camera features include a wake up time of just 0.6 seconds for faster shots. Core components will be a Snapdragon 650 SoC with 3 GB RAM and 32 GB of internal storage space.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 04 > Sony Xperia X gets a detailed teardown
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-04-24 (Update: 2016-04-24)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.