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IFA 2015 | Sony SmartBand 2 coming late September

Sony SmartBand 2 coming late September
Sony SmartBand 2 coming late September
The successor to the original SmartBand fitness tracker will have a new design and a heart rate sensor.

Sony revealed the SmartBand 2 back in late August with a Q3/Q4 2015 release timeframe. Now, the fitness band may be coming earlier than expected as an end-of-September launch is looking likely.

The SmartBand 2 will be leaner than its predecessor and will be available in both Black and White colors. The bracelets are again interchangeable with more color options including Indigo and Pink, though this will cost an extra 30 Euros.

Core specifications include IP68 certification for protection against dust and water. The heart rate monitor is a new feature for continuous recording when worn with a battery life of approximately one-and-a-half days. Battery life can last for up to five days if the heart rate monitor is disabled. The SmartBand 2 can also differentiate between cycling and running/walking movements and can automatically detect when the wearer is sleeping. All data can be logged through the smartphone application LifeLog.

The SmartBand 2 fitness tracker application will be available on all Android and iOS devices as of version 4.4 and 8.2, respectively. The band itself will start at 120 Euros.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 09 > Sony SmartBand 2 coming late September
Daniel Schmidt/ Allen Ngo, 2015-09- 7 (Update: 2015-09- 7)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.