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Samsung teases Windows-based Galaxy Book 12 detachable in new video

Samsung teases Windows-based Galaxy Book 12 detachable in new video
Samsung teases Windows-based Galaxy Book 12 detachable in new video
The video unfortunately shows little about the Surface Pro 4 contender other than a few snippets of the hardware inside. Prices and availability remain mysteries.

With the flagship Galaxy S8 smartphone overtly missing at this year's MWC, Samsung instead turned its focus to a lineup of updated Galaxy tablets. The South Korean manufacturer showed off its Galaxy Tab S3 tablet in addition to two Windows 10 Galaxy Book detachables, but revealed few details on the latter.

A new teaser video below presents a bit of the internals of the larger Galaxy Book 12 including its M.2 2280 SSD and even an active system fan for cooling. Other known specifications include a 12-inch 2160 x 1440 resolution AMOLED display, an ULV Intel Core i5 CPU, S-Pen support, and LTE Cat. 6 WWAN connectivity. In comparison, the smaller 10.6-inch Galaxy Book will be limited to Intel Core M processors as it will likely utilize passive cooling to reduce weight and costs.

Our hands-on preview of the Galaxy Book 12 shows the detachable to be nearly similar in dimensions to the Surface Pro 4 that it will indubitably compete with. Though it certainly feels like a solid Surface Pro 4 contender when held, the manufacturer has not yet announced firm prices or launch dates for the Galaxy Book series. The starting price point and the backlit keyboard cover will both have to knock it out of the park if Samsung wants to make a dent in the largely stale Windows tablet market.

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Samsung

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 03 > Samsung teases Windows-based Galaxy Book 12 detachable in new video
Allen Ngo, 2017-03-28 (Update: 2017-03-28)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.