Notebookcheck

RIM PlayBook Android App Player will exclude certain features

RIM PlayBook Android App Player will exclude certain features
RIM PlayBook Android App Player will exclude certain features
PlayBook tablet will not be able to use Android apps tied to Google Maps, VoIP, widgets or billing services

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a loyal reader of notebookcheck? Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team!

Especially wanted: 
Review Editor - 
Details here
News Editor - Details here

 

 

 

 

As PlayBook owners patiently wait for the promised Android App Player to release, RIM has decided to drop more tidbits on the app in the meantime. Unfortunately, these are probably words that PlayBook users will not be too happy to hear.

According to thinq.co.uk, the Android App Player will have compatibility limitations with some Android software. RIM engineers at Droidcon in Romania explained that certain key features of Android will not work with the PlayBook, including Live Wallpaper, Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) VoIP, apps with widgets, apps tied to Google Maps, billing services and text-to-speech services to name a few.

Whether or not RIM will eventually improve its Android App Player to support such functions in the future is unknown, but don’t expect a 100% compatible Android layer for the PlayBook upon release.

The Android App Player is expected to launch later this year as part of the massive PlayBook 2.0 update. The tablet itself is currently selling at reduced prices in the U.S. due to large stock.

Source(s)

Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2011 09 > RIM PlayBook Android App Player will exclude certain features
Allen Ngo, 2011-09-29 (Update: 2012-05-26)
Allen Ngo

Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.