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Lenovo Moto G5 Plus photos and specifications leak

Lenovo Moto G5 Plus photos and specifications leak
Lenovo Moto G5 Plus photos and specifications leak
Online seller leaks the upcoming Moto G5 Plus with a mainstream Snapdragon 625 SoC, 4 GB RAM, and 5.5-inch 1080p display.

An online seller in Romania has purportedly gotten its hands on an unannounced Moto G5 Plus XT1685 smartphone and is even expecting it to launch for a price of 1650 Romanian leu or the equivalent of 370 Euros. Of course, the product page and any related images for the supposed Moto G5 Plus have since been taken down.

Attentive observers have already created an archive of the page and images of the smartphone. Accordingly, the Moto G5 Plus will carry a 5.5-inch FHD display, Qualcomm Snapdragon 625 SoC, 4 GB RAM, 32 GB of internal storage space, integrated 3080 mAh battery, and 13 MP rear and 5 MP front cameras.

The images below also show a potential fingerprint sensor on the front Home button and a Micro-USB port on the bottom edge. Android 7.0 Nougat is expected to come pre-installed. As for the chassis design, the Moto G5 Plus appears to be very similar to the upcoming Moto X 2017.

The Moto G series has been a series of affordable smartphones from Lenovo with prices typically in the 250 Euro range. Higher-end models belong to the Moto Z family or even the Lenovo Phab 2 series with special cameras for Google Tango support.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 01 > Lenovo Moto G5 Plus photos and specifications leak
Allen Ngo, 2017-01-11 (Update: 2017-01-13)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.