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Intel Skylake promises 30 percent longer battery life

Intel Skylake promises 30 percent longer battery life
Intel Skylake promises 30 percent longer battery life
Leaked comparison slides touch on some key feature set differences between Broadwell and Skylake cores.

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FanlessTech has gotten a glimpse of some advancements Skylake will bring to the table over the current Broadwell generation.

According to the supposedly official Intel slides, the 14 nm Skylake will bring 30 percent longer battery life and 10 to 20 percent better CPU performance for single- and multi-threaded workloads. The new generation also promises 50 percent better 3D gaming performance with its embedded DRAM (eDRAM) for the integrated GT4e graphics core. USB OTG, WiDi 6.0, 4K cameras, and wireless charging will all be supported on the new platform.

Additionally, the new Y-series, H-series, and U-series of Skylake CPUs will have improved battery lives of almost 1.5 hours while having at least 10 percent faster CPU performances compared to their previous generation counterparts. Of course, we will be putting these claims to the test once we have the final consumer models in-house.

The first Skylake devices are expected by this Fall and we will certainly hear more about them this coming IDF 2015 in San Francisco. The Skylake launch comes just one year after the first availability of Broadwell processors last September. The upcoming Asus T100HA will be one of the first devices to ship with Skylake.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 07 > Intel Skylake promises 30 percent longer battery life
Allen Ngo, 2015-07-25 (Update: 2015-07-25)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.