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MWC 2017 | Hisense announces C30 "Rock" waterproof smartphone

Hisense announces C30 "Rock" waterproof smartphone
Hisense announces C30 "Rock" waterproof smartphone
The mid-range Hisense C30 will look very similar to the Nokia 6 with an expected launch price of about 300 Euros.

As the successor to the Hisense C20, the C30 "Rock" promises to retain the waterproof and dustproof characteristics of the series while providing a larger display and more powerful internals. The Chinese electronics manufacturer unveiled the C30 at MWC 2017 with the following specifications:

  • 5.2-inch FHD IPS display w/ Gorilla Glass 4
  • Qualcomm Snapdragon 430 SoC
  • 3 GB RAM
  • 32 GB eMMC
  • 16 MP f/2.0 rear + 5 MP front cameras
  • 3000 mAh battery
  • Micro-USB port
  • Dual-band 802.11ac WLAN w/ Bluetooth 4.2
  • 7.95 mm thick

Aside from its IP68 compliance, the C30 will also be shock-resistant up to 0.5 Joules according to the IK04 standard. The manufacturer demonstrated this capability first-hand at its booth as shown in the clip below. Meanwhile, the wide 84-degree front-facing camera should cater well to selfies. Android 7 Nougat will ship standard and LTE bands 1/2/3/7/8/20/38/40 are all supported to be compatible with most carriers in Europe.

Hisense will launch the C30 for about 300 Euros and the smartphone is already available on certain online retailers for pre-order.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 03 > Hisense announces C30 "Rock" waterproof smartphone
Allen Ngo, 2017-03- 6 (Update: 2017-03- 6)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.