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HTC One M10 photo leaks

HTC One M10 photo leaks (Source: Evleaks)
HTC One M10 photo leaks (Source: Evleaks)
Courtesy of @Evleaks, the image shows the purported high-end smartphone to be more similar to the mainstream One A9 that the actual One M9 flagship.

@Evleaks is at it again with what it claims to be the unannounced HTC One M10 flagship smartphone. The single image already shows it to be very different from the current One M9 including its thicker aluminum edges that look to be more in line with the mainstream One A9 instead. The HTC branding on the face of the phone has disappeared to make room for a potential fingerprint reader as well.

The latest rumors point to a 5.1-inch QHD (2560 x 1440) AMOLED display, Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 SoC, 4 GB RAM, 32 GB eMMC, and a 12 MP "UltraPixel" rear camera with laser auto-focus. Phone Arena is predicting an official reveal next month to avoid being overshadowed by the imminent torrent of other smartphone announcements for MWC 2016 and the Samsung Galaxy Unpacked event.

The Taiwanese manufacturer recently posted disastrous Q4 2015 financial results. While the One M9 and One A9 series of smartphones proved to be hits with reviewers, Samsung, Apple, and rising Chinese manufacturers are quickly squeezing out much of the competition. Like HTC, LG also revealed weak 2015 results for their mobile arm for much the same reasons.

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(Source: Evleaks)
(Source: Evleaks)

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 02 > HTC One M10 photo leaks
Andreas Müller/ Allen Ngo, 2016-02- 8 (Update: 2016-02- 8)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.