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Doogee X5 to be the world's cheapest 5-inch 4G smartphone

Doogee X5 to be the world's cheapest 5-inch 4G smartphone
Doogee X5 to be the world's cheapest 5-inch 4G smartphone
The X5 will feature a 5-inch 720p screen and both 3G and 4G connectivity for just $49.

How cheap can a smartphone get these days? Try less than $50 USD.

Doogee will make available the X5 smartphone this August for a price of just $49.99. The device will even be 4G-capable, though the manufacturer makes no mention of the bands supported or which regions can take advantage of it.

Core specifications include a 5-inch 720p screen, 5 MP rear camera with Flash, 2200 mAh battery, and a polycarbonate chassis. Certainly not groundbreaking hardware, but that is to be expected for such a low price point. Of particular note is its 1.3 GHz MediaTek MT6580 SoC, which is an uncommon processor amongst budget devices. This quad-core chip competes directly against the entry-level Snapdragon 400 series.

Future X5 models will see an upgrade to the recently announced MediaTek MT6735 SoC. The exact launch date of this particular configuration, however, has not yet been revealed. Doogee has also yet to release details on internal storage capacity, battery life, SIM slot features, or MicroSD support for the X5. To be honest, we wouldn't be surprised if the X5 will lack Bluetooth or a front-facing camera due to the disposable nature of the hardware.

Source(s)

Doogee

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 07 > Doogee X5 to be the world's cheapest 5-inch 4G smartphone
Allen Ngo, 2015-07-22 (Update: 2015-07-22)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.