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Dell Precision M3800 workstation gets some new options

Dell Precision M3800 workstation gets some new options
Dell Precision M3800 workstation gets some new options
Dell is now offering even more configurations for the popular workstation including UHD 4K displays, Thunderbolt 2 Ports, and additional storage options.

Calling all graphics designers, engineers, and video editors: Dell has made available new configurations and hardware for the popular 15.6-inch Precision M3800 mobile workstation. In addition to more storage options alongside the already high-capacity internal 2 TB drive, the model can now be configured with IGZO panels from Sharp.

The UltraSharp touch panel with Gorilla Glass NBT is particularly impressive. The aforementioned IGZO Sharp panel boasts a whopping 3840 x 2160 pixels and should offer very deep colors with high backlight brightness. At over 8 million pixels, this panel uses almost twice the pixels as the Retina display on the MacBook Pro 15.

The workstation can also be equipped with a Thunderbolt 2 port for transfer speeds of up to 20 Gbits/s. According to Dell, users can view and edit RAW file formats in UHD while simultaneously backing up the same file. High-resolution displays and high-performance RAID setups are also supported.

[UPDATE 10/07/2015] Post from Dell:

The current Precision M3800 already carries a Thunderbolt interface. Instead, the newer model has removed one USB port on the left edge and one Mini-DisplayPort as the latter is already supported through the Thunderbolt port. The images below show the ports of the newer model.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 07 > Dell Precision M3800 workstation gets some new options
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-07-11 (Update: 2015-07-11)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.