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Best Buy reportedly selling HTC Flyer without digital pen

Best Buy reportedly selling HTC Flyer without digital pen
Best Buy reportedly selling HTC Flyer without digital pen
The Scribe Pen will be sold separately in Best Buys around the U.S. for the outrageous price of $80

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One of the distinguishing factors separating the HTC Flyer from other tablets is its Scribe Pen stylus. Unfortunately, recent reports are suggesting that retailer Best Buy may not even package the stylus with the Flyer at release.

According to Droid Life, HTC has confirmed through Twitter that the pen will indeed not be included with the Flyer. This may only apply to Best Buy stores in the U.S., however, claims Engadget, so the rest of the world could still be receiving the stylus as standard with the purchase of the Flyer. Regardless, this is definitely bad news for those in the U.S., as Best Buy is so far the only exclusive seller of HTC’s latest Gingerbread tablet.

The Scribe Pen will be sold separately in Best Buy, so buyers can still get the stylus if desired. So, what’s the catch? Customers will have to put down a full $80 plus tax just for the stylus, a price which many will probably agree is downright unreasonable.

The stylus will allow Flyer owners to take quick notes with precision input on the capacitive touchscreen. The 7-inch Flyer is currently available for pre-order at the Best Buy online store.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2011 05 > Best Buy reportedly selling HTC Flyer without digital pen
Allen Ngo, 2011-05- 7 (Update: 2012-05-26)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.