Notebookcheck

Asus and Acer may cut down on notebook models in 2012

Asus and Acer may cut down on notebook models in 2012
Both manufacturers may be taking a cue from Apple by shrinking the lineup with more emphasis on fewer models

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a loyal reader of notebookcheck? Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team!

Especially wanted: 
Review Editor - 
Details here
News Editor - Details here

 

 

 

 

It’s not hard to get lost in the sea of model types and numbers offered by computer manufacturers, especially when the differences separating the product lines are sometimes blurry to the average consumer. This may be why the two Taiwanese manufacturers, Acer and Asus, will reportedly decrease the number of product lines beginning next year for a more streamlined set of available notebooks.

According to ODMs close to DigiTimes, Asus in particular will simplify their notebook models throughout the next three years. The source uses the Eee PC lineup as an example where distinct models will reportedly drop to less than half by late 2012. Eventually, the lineup would be divided into three easier to follow levels: entry, mid-range and high-end.

Acer will reportedly follow a similar path and is expected to cut down notebook projects by one-third in 2012, DigiTimes claims.

The source mentions Apple’s “minimalist-style strategy for notebooks” as a catalyst for the reduction in notebook models by the top two Taiwanese manufacturers. By eliminating superfluous models, there may be significant cost saving advantages for the manufacturers and less potential confusion for customers in the market for a notebook.

Source(s)

Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2011 12 > Asus and Acer may cut down on notebook models in 2012
Allen Ngo, 2011-12-14 (Update: 2016-05-12)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.