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Apple iPhone 7C may be coming Q1 2016

Apple iPhone 7C may be coming Q1 2016
Apple iPhone 7C may be coming Q1 2016
The miniature 4-inch iPhone could even sport the same Apple A9 processor as its costlier siblings.

According to mydrivers.com, the iPhone 7C is on schedule for mass production beginning this January. A separate roadmap from telecommunications company China Mobile also reveals an April launch window for the budget-mainstream smartphone. The source claims the smartphone to be a 4-inch device with a 2.5D display, which is a common "feature" on many budget Chinese smartphones where the edges and corners of the front glass are slightly curved instead of flat for a smoother aesthetic.

As for performance, the iPhone 7C may sport the Apple A9 SoC as found on the iPhone 6S and 6S Plus. If so, this would easily make the new Apple one the fastest smartphones in its size class in terms of raw power. The source cites a battery capacity of 1642 mAh and a design based heavily on the iPhone 5S and iPhone 5C.

The current iPhone 6S flagship has received acclaim from press outlets, though it is still lacking in common features like expandable storage and removable battery. Prices have always been high for iPhones and the iPhone 7C is expected to cost as much as 500 Euros according to aforementioned sources.

Rumors of a new 4-inch iPhone have been brewing since early last month. Such an offering would likely target a wider worldwide demographic where the current iPhone flagships may be out-of-reach for many.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 12 > Apple iPhone 7C may be coming Q1 2016
Andreas Müller/ Allen Ngo, 2015-12-30 (Update: 2015-12-30)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.