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AMD reports sales slump and $660 million USD loss for Q4 2015

AMD reports sales slump and $660 million USD loss
AMD reports sales slump and $660 million USD loss
Sales fell 28 percent overall and is expecting to fall again for upcoming Q1 2016, but the company remains optimistic on Polaris.

AMD has released its financial results for Q4 2015 to reveal a slew of losses and slumps. Compared to 2014, sales for all of 2015 were down to $3.99 billion USD from $5.51 billion USD. AMD simultaneously reported an operating loss of $481 million USD and a net loss from $403 million USD a year earlier to $660 million USD.

The quarterly figures show sales of $958 million USD for Q4 2015 compared to $1.24 billion USD in Q4 2014. Operating loss and net loss, however, improved from $330 million to just $49 million and $364 million to $102 million, respectively. AMD is expecting Q1 2016 to bring about yet another overall drop in sales by 14 percent.

The poor results can be largely attributed to the slow sales of AMD's Computing and Graphics sector, which is the company's core consumer business dealing with APUs, CPUs, and GPUs. Sales fell by 42 percent to $1.805 billion USD from $3.132 billion USD with operating losses rising from $76 million to $502 million.

On the business and enterprise side that includes the semi-custom chips on the Playstation 4 and Xbox One, sales have declined by just 8 percent compared to 2014 with operating profits falling from 399 million USD to 215 million. The upcoming and promising Polaris GPUs should give AMD the boost it needs for better results come late 2016.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 01 > AMD reports sales slump and $660 million USD loss for Q4 2015
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-01-20 (Update: 2016-01-20)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.