Review HP Pavilion g7-2007sg notebook

Till Schönborn (translated by Bernie Pechlaner), 09/09/2012

AMD or Intel? HP's Pavilion g7 series gives the potential buyer either option. We take a look at the top model (MSRP around 700 Euro) with Core i7 processor and Radeon graphics and ask ourselves the following question: is the Intel version of the 17-inch notebook worth the price premium?

The HP Pavilion g7 series covers the whole gamut: a price search lists up to thirty different models of the versatile multimedia notebook - covering the low end to upper middle class and everything in-between.

After evaluating two of the less expensive models with AMD's Trinity APU (g7-2053sg with A6-4400M and g7-2051sg with A10-4600M) in the last few weeks, we decided to take a look at the most powerful member of the series - the g7-2007sg. This model retails for over 700 Euro and features a speedy Intel Core i7-3612QM, 8 GB RAM, and a 750 GB hard drive. The Radeon HD 7670M should offer enough performance for gaming, although the card might have some issues with the native resolution of the 17-inch display (1600 x 900 pixels).

Of course, other manufacturers offer models competing in the same bracket. Possible alternatives are the Lenovo G780Dell Inspiron 17R-SE , and the Acer Aspire V3-771G (depending on the configuration). Let's see if HP's model is able to differentiate itself from its competition.

Case

The chassis: black, shiny, and a dust magnet
The chassis: black, shiny, and a dust magnet

The chassis of the Pavilion g7-2007sg is made of black plastic and is identical to the the AMD version. Unfortunately, that's not a plus point: the highly reflective and rather cheap looking piano finish is a dirt magnet and requires frequent cleaning. Rigidity and overall sturdiness could use some improvement as well: both the display and the base unit don't resist twisting forces well and protest with an occasional creaking sound. Two positive aspects are the fairly low weight of under 3 kilogram (6.61 pounds) and the - at least for our test sample - decent build quality.

To be fair though: depending on the components, the Pavilion g7 can be had for about 400 Euro on up. Considering this price range, the quality is acceptable and not much different from other (and similar) models. For an in-depth look at the chassis please check the review of the g7-2051sg.

In addition to the identical chassis, the port selection of our test system holds no surprises in store when compared to other g7 models. The buyer gets 2x USB 3.0 and one additional USB 2.0 port. For a fairly large multimedia notebook the port selection is certainly not overwhelming, but nonetheless adequate. Most users will be perfectly happy with aforementioned ports, the display ports (VGA and HDMI), and the usual standard fare of Kensington lock slot and headphone / microphone jacks.

We don't think that the Fast-Ethernet port deserves is name: its maximum speed of 100 MBit/s is simply behind the times. The positioning of the ports could also be better: especially the lack of distance between the USB ports can be problematic if wider thumb drives are used.

Front: no ports
Front: no ports
Left side: VGA, exhaust fan, HDMI, Ethernet port, 2x USB 3.0, microphone and headphone jacks, card reader
Left side: VGA, exhaust fan, HDMI, Ethernet port, 2x USB 3.0, microphone and headphone jacks, card reader
Back: no ports
Back: no ports
Right side: DVD-RW drive, USB 2.0, power jack, Kensington lock slot
Right side: DVD-RW drive, USB 2.0, power jack, Kensington lock slot

Communication

HP didn't go with an offering from well an established manufacturer for the WLAN module - rather, they sourced it from Ralink (a not very well-known company). The entry-level RT5390R only supports single stream (1x1) and therefore limits the transfer rate to 150 MBit/s. The module supports IEEE standard 802.11b/g/n but only offers connections via the 2.4GHz band. An option for 5 GHz as well as a bluetooth module are missing. HP also doesn't offer integrated UMTS or LTE - but considering that this notebook is a desktop replacement, this is certainly not a big deal.

The 0.3 megapixel webcam fails to impress. Because of the low resolution, quality suffers when taking snapshots or recording video clips: images are grainy and lack details. The webcam is just good enough for the occasional video chat and not much more. The microphone, however, is of decent quality and works quite well.

Accessories

HP ships the notebook with a 90 watt power adapter, the battery (which is inserted at the bottom), and a quickstart guide. This should be enough to get a new owner started - but we would have liked to see driver and recovery DVDs included in the box as well.

The HP Recovery Manger allows the user to create their own recovery / system backup set. This requires five DVDs or an adequately sized USB stick. Other included tools, like the Connection Manager, the Security Assistant or the Setup Manager range from useful to completely useless. We really don't appreciate the embedded ad links on the desktop and in the different toolbars of the browser.

Maintenance

After the removal of a single screw, the user can gain access to the inside of the notebook via a useful sliding cover. Unfortunately, the expansion options are limited: the 2.5-inch hard drive carrier and both DIMM slots are already in use; a mSATA connection is not offered. The WLAN module is accessible should a swap become necessary. In order to clean the fan and the heatsink, further disassembly of the unit is required.

Warranty

HP provides a standard one year warranty for their consumer notebooks - only the more expensive EliteBooks come with longer coverage. Fortunately, HP offers a one year extended warranty with pickup and return ("Care Pack"), which can be purchased from various online retailers for about 60 Euro.

Input Devices

Since the input devices don't differ much from the AMD models we already reviewed, we will just provide a brief summary in place of a full discussion.

Keyboard

The chiclet keyboard sports a matte black finish and exhibits fairly minimal flex. The keys offer medium resistance when depressed and give precise feedback. Since the surface of the keys (15 x 15 millimeter / 0.59 x 0.59 inches) is textured, even high typing speeds are not a problem. Noise is also well controlled, which further increases the perceived quality.

Touchpad

The Synaptics touchpad (10.5 x 5.3 centimeter / 4.13 x 2.01 inches) is adequately sized and allows moving the cursor across the screen without having to resort to multiple passes. The surface of the touchpad is textured and a bit "draggy", but allows for precise control and gives the user excellent feedback about each movement. We also appreciated the short travel and distinct click-feedback of the individual mouse buttons located directly under the touchpad area.

Keyboard
Keyboard
Touchpad
Touchpad

Display

One of our main points of criticism when we reviewed the Pavilion g7 before was the very disappointing display. Did HP improve the display for the expensive Intel version? The specs are identical: a 17.3-inch display with a resolution of 1600 x 900 pixels. As a result, the pixel density is fairly low at 106 dpi.

When we measured the display brightness, we could not detect any improvements. On the contrary: We recorded an average brightness of 173 cd/m² - lower than the 181 to 184 cd/m² we measured for the AMD models. Of course this discrepancy could also be due to manufacturing tolerances. Brightness distribution is also a bit worse, although not to the point where it is visible to the eye.

160
cd/m²
172
cd/m²
176
cd/m²
168
cd/m²
174
cd/m²
176
cd/m²
172
cd/m²
181
cd/m²
175
cd/m²
Distribution of brightness
Information
Gossen Mavo-Monitor
Maximum: 181 cd/m²
Average: 172.7 cd/m²
Brightness Distribution: 88 %
Center on Battery: 174 cd/m²
Black: 1.05 cd/m²
Contrast: 166:1

A closer look at the display reveals that HP uses a TN panel from AU Optronics (AUO139E) - the same one also found in the other notebooks of the series. Therefore it comes as no surprise that neither the black point value (1.05 cd/m²) nor the contrast (166:1) differ much from what we measured when we tested the g7-2051sg and the g7-2053sg. The result is a rather unimpressive display - especially noticeable when playing games or watching movies.

The reflective display makes colors look better than they actually are. The sRGB color space is represented for the most part, but the expansive Adobe RGB reference color space is inadequately covered. Of course, the average home user does not work with professional graphics software and won't be adversely affected. 

g7-2007sg vs. AdobeRGB (t)
g7-2007sg vs. AdobeRGB (t)
g7-2007sg vs. sRGB (t)
g7-2007sg vs. sRGB (t)
g7-2007sg vs. g7-2051sg (t)
g7-2007sg vs. g7-2051sg (t)
Outdoor use
Outdoor use

As it is always the case with glare-type displays, exposure to bright light decreases the readability of the screen substantially. This is very noticeable during outdoor use - the user usually gets to see his own reflection and not much else. Too bad that the Pavilion g7 doesn't offer a screen brightness of around 250 to 300 cd/m² - it would certainly help out those wanting to take the notebook outside on a bright summer day.

Viewing angles HP Pavilion g7-2007sg
Viewing angles HP Pavilion g7-2007sg

We already talked about the fairly mediocre viewing angle stability of the display when we reviewed the g7-2051sg. Our test sample does as well (or as badly, if you will) as most other notebooks in this price category. Especially when deviating from the vertical, contrast decreases quickly. As long the user only moves sideways a bit and the angle doesn't get to severe, the loss in quality is acceptable.

If the user does not own an external monitor that supports HDMI, the VGA port is a good alternative. High sharpness and minimal flickering confirm that the analog port is of high quality.

Performance

3,1 GHz - maximum Turbo Boot frequency
3,1 GHz - maximum Turbo Boot frequency

We already mentioned it: the Pavilion g7 comes in may different flavors and configurations. HP offers both AMD and Intel processors to cover both performance and price aspects.

Our top-of the line test system features the fasted CPU the series offers - an Intel Core i7-3612QM. This quad-core processor is part of Intel's Ivy Bridge lineup and thus features 22 nanometer construction and enhanced energy efficiency. This particular quad-core processor is the only one with a TDP of 35 watts and features a lower frequency of only 2.1 GHz. Depending on load, Turbo Boost 2.0 overclocks the cores up to 3.1 GHz. The CPU also features Hyper-Threading to improve multi-thread performance. For additional information, please take a look at our CPU Database.

Since this is a fast multimedia notebook, the integrated HD Graphics 4000 wouldn't offer enough performance. To that end, HP adds a dedicated middle-class graphics card - a Radeon HD 7670M. To ensure good battery life, the cards get switched dynamically. AMD's "Switchable Graphics" and their answer to Nvidia's Optimus technology is called Enduro.

The g7-2007sg comes with a 750 GB hard drive and 8 GB RAM (two 4 GB modules of DDR3-1600 RAM from Nanya).

Systeminfo CPUZ CPU
Systeminfo CPUZ Cache
Systeminfo CPUZ Mainboard
Systeminfo CPUZ RAM
Systeminfo CPUZ RAM SPD
Systeminfo HWInfo
DPC Latenzen
 
System information HP Pavilion g7-2007sg

Processor

We were not overly pleased with the performance of the AMD versions. Many potential buyers are probably going to be interested in the (admittedly much more expensive) laptop featuring the Intel Core i7-3612QM.

Cinebench R10 - Rendering Single CPUs 64Bit
HP Pavilion g7-2007sg
Radeon HD 7670M, 3612QM, Toshiba MK7575GSX
5236 Points ∼21%
HP Pavilion g7-2053sg
Radeon HD 7520G, A6-4400M, Toshiba MK6476GSX
3165 Points ∼13% -40%
HP Pavilion g7-2051sg
Radeon HD 7660G + HD 7670M Dual Graphics, A10-4600M, Hitachi Travelstar 5K750 HTS547550A9E384
2806 Points ∼11% -46%

Let's start with the Single-Thread performance. The A10-4600M (2806 points in the Cinebench R10 64 Bit) ranks at the very bottom of the g7 performance list. The A6-4400M features a better Turbo Boost mode and outperforms the 4600M easily (3165 points). Compared to the 5236 points the Core i7 managed to score here, both APUs systems don't stand a chance.

Cinebench R11.5 - CPU Multi 64Bit
HP Pavilion g7-2007sg
Radeon HD 7670M, 3612QM, Toshiba MK7575GSX
5.66 Points ∼32%
HP Pavilion g7-2053sg
Radeon HD 7520G, A6-4400M, Toshiba MK6476GSX
1.13 Points ∼6% -80%
HP Pavilion g7-2051sg
Radeon HD 7660G + HD 7670M Dual Graphics, A10-4600M, Hitachi Travelstar 5K750 HTS547550A9E384
1.98 Points ∼11% -65%

The Multi-Threading test Cinebench R11.5 shows an even greater difference in performance. Although the A10 (1.98 points) outscores the (nominally weaker) A6 (1.13 points), the Intel i7-3612QM outperforms both by a fair margin and ends up with 5.66 points. To put that into perspective: even the 45 watt i7-3610QM is only about 10 percent faster. There is no decrease in performance while the notebook is running on battery.

Cinebench R10 Rendering Single 32Bit
4163
Cinebench R10 Rendering Multiple CPUs 32Bit
15705
Cinebench R10 Shading 32Bit
7285
Cinebench R10 Rendering Single CPUs 64Bit
5236 Points
Cinebench R10 Rendering Multiple CPUs 64Bit
19210 Points
Cinebench R10 Shading 64Bit
7361 Points
Cinebench R11.5 CPU Single 64Bit
1.29 Points
Cinebench R11.5 CPU Multi 64Bit
5.66 Points
Cinebench R11.5 OpenGL 64Bit
34.29 fps
Help

Storage Devices

HD-Tune benchmark
HD-Tune benchmark

A speedy SSD can't be expected in a notebook retailing for 700 Euro - so we won't hold that against the HP. The 750 GB hard drive is actually an advantage here, as it allows the user to store plenty of photos, movies, and music. The 2.5-inch hard drive is sourced from Toshiba (MK7575GSX), spins at 5400 RPM and has 8 MB cache.

As far as performance is concerned, the Toshiba hard drive can't quite keep up with models spinning at 7200 RPM. The average transfer rate is just above 80 MB/s and random read access time is 16.9 milliseconds (HD Tune). This places the hard drive right in the middle of our benchmark list.

Of course those results pale in comparison with current SSDs. Those willing to give up some storage space in favor of far quicker boot times and application starts, can swap out the hard drive for a SSD (which continue to decrease in price). We'll take more about expansion in our section on "maintenance".

Toshiba MK7575GSX
Transfer Rate Minimum: 34.4 MB/s
Transfer Rate Maximum: 105.7 MB/s
Transfer Rate Average: 78.4 MB/s
Access Time: 16.9 ms
Burst Rate: 107.8 MB/s
CPU Usage: 1 %

System Performance

The PCMark tests from Futuremark are know for reacting strongly to both processor and hard drive speed. Our test system with the Core i7 does exceedingly well here, although high-end notebooks with SSD are able to outperform the g7-2007sg.

The review system with the Intel processor scores 2760 points in PCMark 7 and outscores the models with Trinity APU (it's about 50 to 80 percent faster). Running the older PCMark Vantage, the differences are even more pronounced. The g7-2007sg performs about as well as the Dell Inspiron 17R-SE, which also features a quad-core processor.

Of course it remains to be seen is how noticeable the performance differences are during the daily use of the notebook. Those who mostly surf the Internet, run office type applications, and edit a few photos here and there, are not going to notice a huge advantage to the inexpensive system with the A10-4600M. Power users, who edit HD movies or perform other CPU intensive tasks, are going to reap the benefits of the much faster Core i7-3612QM and the reserves it offers. The system with the Intel chip is going to be a little more future-proof as well.

5.6
Windows 7 Experience Index
Processor
Calculations per second
7.5
Memory (RAM)
Memory operations per second
7.8
Graphics
Desktop performance for Windows Aero
5.6
Gaming graphics
3D business and gaming graphics
6.5
Primary hard disk
Disk data transfer rate
5.9
PC Mark
PCMark Vantage9124 points
PCMark 72760 points
Help

Graphics Card

Graphics switching: Enduro
Graphics switching: Enduro

The AMD Radeon HD 7670M is essentially a newly released version of the Radeon HD 6650M (introduced January 2011). Its processor is still based on the older 40 nanometer process and uses the VLIW5 architecture. The DirectX 11 accelerator has 480 ALUs, separated in 96 blocks, and a frequency of 600 MHz. The memory interface has a 128 bit interface to 1 GB DDR3-VRAM (900 MHz).

The performance of the 7670M makes the card a direct competitor of the GeForce GT 630M, as the results are very close. Running 3DMark 11, the Radeon card scored 1205 points - more than OK for the price bracket of this notebook. Although the less expensive Pavilion g7-2051sg seems to offer better graphics performance due to its Crossfire combination of APU and Radeon GPU (2047 points), it has to be said that it suffers from micro stutters and driver issues (these issues are not reflected in the higher score).

Our test system showed us again that AMD's Enduro technology isn't quite ready for prime time. We miss the ability to select the graphics processor via a handy right click, which is something Nvidia's Optimus offers. There is also no global option to put one or the other graphics processor into service. Since the system rarely selects the dedicated AMD GPU when playing games, the user needs to assign each application manually in the menu of the graphics driver.

Unlike the CPU, running on battery does affect graphics performance, as the GPU throttles down - the score (3DMark 06) is about 40% lower and drops to under 5000 points.

 

 

3D Mark
3DMark 0515237 points
3DMark 06
 1280x1024
8203 points
3DMark Vantage5183 points
3DMark 111205 points
Help

Gaming Performance

Deus Ex: Human Revolution
Deus Ex: Human Revolution

As far as gaming performance is concerned, the g7-2007sg delivers what we expected from the combination of Core i7-3612QM and Radeon HD 7670M. Using the maximum display resolution of 1600 x 900 pixels while playing any of the current titles, pushes the graphics card quickly to its limits. The user is then forced to either lower the details or to select a lower resolution. The particularly demanding Battlefield 3 requires the lowest quality setting and a resolution of 1024 x 768  to remain playable without any stutters.

Those after the best game-playing experience and additional quality features (AA, AF) need a notebook with a much more powerful graphics processor - at least a GeForce GT 650M or better.

low med.high ultra
Deus Ex Human Revolution (2011) 95.137.2fps
Battlefield 3 (2011) 4026.322.3fps
Anno 2070 (2011) 89.534.521.3fps
Diablo III (2012) 61.144.638.2fps

Noise Level

Even during idle and low ambient temperatures, the fan in the notebook is always on (albeit spinning slowly). The result is a system noise level of 33.1 to 34.2 dB(A) - definitely noticeable in quiet environments. We don't think it's necessary: other notebooks remain passively cooled when the temperature of their processor is between 30 and 40 degrees Celsius (86 to 104 degrees Fahrenheit). The hard drive of the system is barely audible.

During 3D applications, noise level only increases about 3 to 4 dB and reaches 37.6 dB(A). Compared to other 17-inch systems, the g7-2007sg does well here and remains fairly unobtrusive even during longer gaming sessions. The noise level peaked at a surprisingly high 48.2 dB(A) when we ran our stress test - a value that won't be reached during normal use though. Under full load, the fan system emits fairly high frequencies, but when the load decreases, the noise level drops back down within a few seconds.

Noise Level

Idle 33.1 / 33.2 / 34.2 dB(A)
HDD 33.5 dB(A)
DVD 36.1 / dB(A)
Load 37.6 / 48.2 dB(A)
 
    30 dB
silent
40 dB
audible
50 dB
loud
 
min: , med: , max:    Voltcraft SL 320 (15 cm distance)

Temperature

Stress test
Stress test

While performing normal office duties, the temperature of the test system only increases marginally and is barely above ambient. Without any significant load, the top and the bottom of the laptop only reach about 30 degrees Celsius (86 degrees Fahrenheit). The notebook can therefore be used on the lap without issues.

Things change rapidly when we simulate a high load using Prime95 and FurMark. We measured between 50 to 60 degrees Celsius (122 to 140 degrees Fahrenheit) in some areas - for example around the system fan vent and the battery. What we noted in our section on Noise Level holds true here, too - those extreme values are usually the result of synthetic benchmark testing and don't reflect every day use.

The reason why HP decided to use the more energy efficient Core i7-3612QM and not (a more powerful) 45 watt processor becomes evident when we take a closer look: during the stress test, the processor frequency decreases first to 2.1 GHz and even throttles down to 1.2 GHz after longer run times. The CPU core temperature hovers around 85 degrees Celsius (185 degrees Fahrenheit). We were unable to obtain a result for the Radeon HD 7670M, although we didn't encounter any throttling. It has to be said that throttling really is a non-issue, as a 3DMark 11 test conducted directly after the stress test didn't show a decrease in performance at all.

Max. Load
 55.2 °C52.4 °C42 °C 
 47.8 °C49.3 °C37.7 °C 
 40.3 °C37 °C32.6 °C 
Maximum: 55.2 °C
Average: 43.8 °C
39.6 °C60 °C54.1 °C
37.5 °C53 °C45 °C
35.6 °C36.2 °C36 °C
Maximum: 60 °C
Average: 44.1 °C
Power Supply (max.)  55.2 °C | Room Temperature 25.2 °C | Voltcraft IR-360

Speakers

Sound settings
Sound settings

Since the Pavilion g7-2007sg shares the same chassis with the already reviewed AMD systems, it comes as no surprise that the sound system is identical. The stereo speakers from Altec Lansing are clear and sufficiently loud. We don't really like the overbearing highs and the more or less completely lacking bass. The user can adjust the settings using the equalizer and improve the sound a bit. In cases where the laptop remains stationary, we recommend hooking up external speakers using the (3.5 millimeter) audio jack or the HDMI port.

Power Consumption

Although the g7-2007sg is quite powerful, the notebook is very frugal while idling and only consumes between 10.4 and 12.3 watts - a result almost identical to the model with the AMDs Trinity-APU A10-4600M. Even compared to other large multimedia notebooks like the Dell Inspiron 17R-SE , the laptop does well here.

The 3DMark 06 result (which we will use here in place of 3D games) is quite surprising, as it comes in at a really low 44 watts. Only when we subject the processor and the graphics card to maximum load, we start pushing the power adapter (90 watts) to its limit - we recorded up to 86.6 watts. The aforementioned throttling keeps things under control and reduces power consumption to between 60 and 70 watts intermittently.

Power Consumption

Off / Standby 0.1 / 0.5 Watt
Idle 10.4 / 12.3 / 12.3 Watt
Load 44 / 86.6 Watt
 
Key: min: , med: , max:         Voltcraft VC 940

Battery Life

Since the power consumption is very close to results the AMD models posted, we expected the Intel version of the Pavilion g7 to score almost the same.

Think again: Instead of lasting 8 hours, the notebook shuts down after 5 hours and 38 minutes in our Battery Eater Readers Test (WLAN and GPU turned off, power saver profile, display brightness turned all the way down). We can't really explain the result, but unfortunately we don't have access to the AMD test systems to figure why the results are so different. 

While surfing via WLAN (GPU turned off, power saver profile, display brightness of 150 cd/m²), the notebook reached a decent 3 hours and 53 minutes. This test (a script that opens different websites and HD videos every 40 seconds) is more realistic than the scenario described above.

Any power saving measures don't really come into play when subjecting the notebook to heavy loads during the Battery Eater Classic Test (WLAN and GPU on, high performance profile, maximum brightness) - so the expected run time is short. The Pavilion lasted about 46 minutes before it shut down. Recharging takes about one and a half hours.

Maximum battery life (Readers Test)
Maximum battery life (Readers Test)
Minimum battery life (Classic Test)
Minimum battery life (Classic Test)
Charging
Charging
Battery Runtime
Idle (without WLAN, min brightness)
5h 38min
WiFi Surfing
3h 53min
DVD
2h 52min
Load (maximum brightness)
0h 46min

Verdict

HP Pavilion g7-2007sg
HP Pavilion g7-2007sg

The price difference between the HP Pavilion g7-2007sg and the (previously reviewed) g7-2051sg with AMD A10-4600M is about 150 Euro - a pretty significant jump. Is this money well spent?

In addition to the additional RAM, the price increase can be attributed to the Core i7-3612QM. On the plus side, the Intel CPU does offer two to three times the performance of the Trinity APU - especially noticeable during photo editing or working with video software. Processor intensive games (for example simulation or strategy games) also benefit from the additional performance. Of course, it's mostly the graphic card which restricts frame rates and thus gaming performance. We wouldn't recommend this notebook for hardcore gaming anyways - although those wanting to play the occasional game or multimedia fans should be quite pleased with it.

Our main points of criticism are elsewhere: the glossy and moderately sturdy chassis, the very slow Fast-Ethernet port, and a fan system that's always on - it would be great if HP could make some improvements here. What we really would wish for is a better (at least brighter) display.

Since the price-performance ratio is very good, we are inclined to overlook some of the weaknesses. Overall we can recommend the system - with some caveats. Competing (and similarly equipped) models, like the Dell Inspiron 17R-SE or Lenovo G780 retail for 50 to 100 Euro more. On the other hand, there's competition from within: the less expensive HP Pavilion g7-2051sg is probably sufficient for many users. 

Notebook courtesy of ... GetGoods

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In Review: HP Pavilion g7-2007sg, courtesy of:
In Review: HP Pavilion g7-2007sg, courtesy of:

Specifications

HP Pavilion g7-2007sg

:: Processor
:: Mainboard
Intel HM76 (Panther Point)
:: Memory
8192 MB, 2x 4096 MByte Nanya DDR3-1600 CL11, 2 Slots
:: Graphics adapter
AMD Radeon HD 7670M - 1024 MB, Core: 600 MHz, Memory: 900 MHz, DDR3-VRAM, AMD Switchable Grahpics (Enduro)
:: Display
17.3 inch 16:9, 1600x900 pixel, AUO139E, TN-Panel, LED-Backlight, glossy: yes
:: Harddisk
Toshiba MK7575GSX, 750 GB 5400 rpm 8 MByte Cache
:: Soundcard
Intel Panther Point PCH - High Definition Audio Controller
:: Connections
1 USB 2.0, 2 USB 3.0, 1 VGA, 1 HDMI, 1 Kensington Lock, Audio Connections: headphone jack, microphone (3.5 millimeter) , Card Reader: 4-in-1 card reader (SD/SDHC/SDXC/MMC),
:: Networking
Realtek PCIe FE Family Controller 10/100 (10MBit), Ralink RT5390 802.11 b/g/n WiFi Adapter (b g n )
:: Optical drive
HP DVD-RAM UJ8B1
:: Size
height x width x depth (in mm): 36.8 x 412 x 267
:: Weight
2.98 kg Power Supply: 0.2 kg
:: Battery
48 Wh Lithium-Ion, 6 Zellen
:: Price
750 Euro
:: Operating System
Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64 Bit
:: Additional features
Webcam: 1.3MP, Speakers: Altec Lansing stereo speakers, Keyboard: Chiclet, Keyboard Light: no, Quickstart guide, 90 watt power adapter, HP Security Assistant, HP Connection Manager, HP Setup Manager, Norton Internet Security, Office 2010 Starter

 

Haven't we see seen this one before?
Haven't we see seen this one before?
and the keyboard exhibits minimal flex.
and the keyboard exhibits minimal flex.
The touchpad is precise and works without lag.
The touchpad is precise and works without lag.
The area just above the keyboard houses the stero speakers - which definitely lack bass.
The area just above the keyboard houses the stero speakers - which definitely lack bass.
During normal use, 48 Wh battery lasts about 3 to 4 hours.
During normal use, 48 Wh battery lasts about 3 to 4 hours.
The bottom of the notebook is matte plastic and hence differs from the rest of the chassis, ...
The bottom of the notebook is matte plastic and hence differs from the rest of the chassis, ...
a cover allows access to the hardware.
a cover allows access to the hardware.
The two RAM slots hold a 4 GB module each, ...
The two RAM slots hold a 4 GB module each, ...
the 2.5-inch caddy holds a hard drive with 750 GB capacity.
the 2.5-inch caddy holds a hard drive with 750 GB capacity.
Together with the WLAN module, these are the only components replaceable by the user.
Together with the WLAN module, these are the only components which a user can replace.
keys with good resistance and feedback, ...
keys with good resistance and feedback, ...
The quality of the input devices is perfectly OK:
The quality of the input devices is perfectly OK:
HP offers their multimedia notebook Pavilion g7...
HP offers their multimedia notebook Pavilion g7...
in a lot of different configurations.
in a lot of different configurations.
All versions use the identical 17-inch chassis, ...
All versions use the identical 17-inch chassis, ...
which is almost entirely covered in glossy paint.
which is almost entirely covered in glossy paint.
The display is also highly reflective.
The display is also highly reflective.
The port selection has a surprise in store: it features a very outdated Fast-Ethernet port,
The port selection has a surprise in store: it features a very outdated Fast-Ethernet port,
otherwise the notebook offers standard fare.
otherwise the notebook offers standard fare.
Not very convenient: the position of the status LEDs.
Not very convenient: the position of the status LEDs.
For about 700 Euro they buyer gets his or her money's worth.
For about 700 Euro they buyer gets his or her money's worth.
Only during a stress test we were able to push the compact 90 watt power adapter to its limit.
Only during a stress test we were able to push the compact 90 watt power adapter to its limit.

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Price comparison

Pro

+High performance
+Ample RAM
+Not very power hungry
+Attractive price
+2x USB 3.0
 

Cons

-Reflective chassis surfaces
-Weak display
-Very warm under load
-Not very upgradable
-Only 1 year warranty

Shortcut

What we like

Considering the components, especially the speedy Core i7 processor, the price of about 700 Euro sure is very attractive.

What we would like to see

Considering the overall performance for the money, it doesn't really surprise us that there are shortcomings. Chassis, port selection, and display all are all just about average.

What surprises us

During idle, the g7-2007sg posts a battery life that almost 3 hours shy of the AMD model g7-2051s - even though the capacity of the batteries is identical. Everyday performance shows the Intel processor in a better light though.

The competition

Other affordable multimedia notebooks in the 17-inch class. A few examples are the Lenovo G780Dell Inspiron 17R-SE, or the Acer Aspire V3 series.

Rating

HP Pavilion g7-2007sg
08/23/2012 v3
Till Schönborn

Chassis
74%
Keyboard
78%
Pointing Device
80%
Connectivity
66%
Weight
73%
Battery
75%
Display
69%
Games Performance
80%
Application Performance
91%
Temperature
60%
Noise
78%
Add Points
78%
Average
75%
75%
Multimedia *
Weighted Average

> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > Reviews > Archive of our own reviews > Review HP Pavilion g7-2007sg notebook
Author: Till Schönborn, 2012-09- 9 (Update: 2013-06- 6)