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Snapdragon 836 may launch first on the Google Pixel 2

Snapdragon 836 may make its debut on the Google Pixel 2
Snapdragon 836 may make its debut on the Google Pixel 2
The Snapdragon 836 should be a small bump in raw horsepower over the Snapdragon 835 to make it even faster than the North American Galaxy S8 and most other current flagships.

We reported in April that the rumored Pixel 2 smartphone may carry the Snapdragon 835 according to codenames found in the Google AOSP code. Now, conflicting reports from Ubergizmo are suggesting otherwise by hinting at the newer Snapdragon 836 instead.

According to the source, the Google smartphone is expected to sport a 10 percent faster processor than the Snapdragon 835 SoC. The theoretical 2.5 GHz Snapdragon 836 should fit the bill nicely as the SoC should be a minor upgrade over the Snapdragon 835 but with slightly higher clocks and an improved image processor for potentially better pictures.

Nothing about the Pixel 2 has been officially confirmed by Google and so these rumors should be taken with a grain of salt. Nonetheless, an October launch window is expected if past Pixel and Nexus smartphones are any indication. At least two models should be available despite the fact that the current rumor makes no mention of whether or not the Snapdragon 836 will apply to the smaller 5-inch "Walleye" model or the larger 6-inch "Taimen" model.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 07 > Snapdragon 836 may launch first on the Google Pixel 2
Allen Ngo, 2017-07-25 (Update: 2017-07-25)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.