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Samsung Galaxy S8 could include UHD display and dual rear cameras

Samsung Galaxy S8 could include UHD display and dual rear cameras
Samsung Galaxy S8 could include UHD display and dual rear cameras
The UHD display aims to improve VR experience where the higher pixel count can have a much larger impact.

Samsung only recently launched its Galaxy S7 series to worldwide fanfare, but rumors originating from China are already speculating about the inevitable successor. Samsung will very likely unveil the Galaxy S8 sometime next year and the Chinese source claims to have close ties to those from the industry on the matter.

Accordingly, the Galaxy S8 may be coming with dual rear cameras similar to the Leica cameras on the recent Huawei P9. Additionally, the smartphone could incorporate a 4K UHD panel for a superior VR experience. It's worth noting that Samsung showed off both a retractable 5.7-inch FHD panel and a 5.5-inch UHD panel at this year's Display Week 2016.

The source does not specify whether or not the dual cameras would simply be two separate lenses or two individual sensors altogether. They may, however, have improved HDR support and Smart Zoom functionality with development help from Samsung Electro-Mechanics (Semco). The Galaxy S8 series should also include a USB Type-C port as standard unlike on the current generation.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 06 > Samsung Galaxy S8 could include UHD display and dual rear cameras
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-06-23 (Update: 2016-06-23)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.