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Samsung Galaxy S7 experiencing slow-motion recording issues

Samsung Galaxy S7 experiencing slow-motion recording issues
Samsung Galaxy S7 experiencing slow-motion recording issues
The stuttering problems appear to be only affecting Galaxy S7 SKUs with the Snapdragon 820 SoC while the Exynos 8890 SoC can presumably run the same actions without any hiccups.

Is the Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 SoC struggling with slow-motion videos? More and more owners of the Samsung Galaxy S7 are coming forth with frame skips and stuttering issues regarding the smartphone's slow-motion recording performance. Interestingly, most of the reports stem from owners of the Snapdragon 820 version of the smartphone while the Exynos version appears unaffected. The Snapdragon Galaxy S7 is sold primarily in North America.

Exactly why the Galaxy S7 with the Exynos 8890 SoC is not facing the same issues is currently unknown. The stuttering issues for the Snapdragon 820 model could simply be due to a possible firmware bug related to the Qualcomm chip.

The South Korean manufacturer has yet to comment on the issue and is remaining tight-lipped for now, likely until it can verify and identify the root of the problem. See our reviews on the Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 Edge smartphones with the Exynos 8890 SoC for more details on the hardware and performances of Samsung's latest flagships. The Samsung flagships were recently crowned as "best smartphone" by Consumer Reports and having the "best smartphone display" by DisplayMate.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 04 > Samsung Galaxy S7 experiencing slow-motion recording issues
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-04- 5 (Update: 2016-04- 5)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.