Notebookcheck Logo

Researchers use quantum computers to optimize ray-tracing workload by nearly 200 percent, but real-life applications remain distant

Researchers in the study used quantum computing techniques to optimize a ray tracing workload (Image source: Caltech)
Researchers in the study used quantum computing techniques to optimize a ray tracing workload (Image source: Caltech)
Researchers in Portugal, the US, and the UK recently published a paper in which they attempted to leverage quantum computing algorithms to optimize ray-traced rendering workloads. The researchers' approach helped cut intersections per ray in a scene by a factor of three. The use of older NISQ quantum computing technology meant rendering took several hours, however.

Researchers in an international study recently leveraged quantum computing techniques to optimize and speed up a conventional ray-tracing algorithm by a factor of 3. The researchers used a simple, 128 x 128 pixel 3D scene to compare a conventional ray-traced renderer to one that was accelerated with quantum computing  algorithms. The quantum computing system optimized the scene by reducing the number of ray intersections from 64 per ray to 22. 

"Accelerated" is somewhat of a relative term, however, in this case. The researchers used a relatively less-capable  Noisy Intermediate-Scale Quantum (NISQ) device to do the quantum computations. This meant that the "optimized" approach took several hours to render. 

Quantum computing isn't of immediate use to accelerate ray-tracing workloads in today's games. However, the researchers proved that quantum techniques could significantly optimize ray-tracing performance, at least once quantum computing matures and commercial products become viable. This opens the door to interesting future possibilities. 

Check out the ray-tracing enabled ASUS TUF Gaming GeForce RTX 3080 here on Amazon. 

static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
.170
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2022 05 > Researchers use quantum computers to optimize ray-tracing workload by nearly 200 percent, but real-life applications remain distant
Arjun Krishna Lal, 2022-05-25 (Update: 2022-05-25)