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New data suggests up to three different OnePlus 2 models

New data suggests up to three different OnePlus 2 models
New data suggests up to three different OnePlus 2 models
Sketches and benchmarks also reveal dual rear cameras and a fingerprint sensor.

The OnePlus rumor mill is in full swing as the Bluetooth Special Interest Group (SIG) database reveals 3 separate models for the upcoming OnePlus 2 smartphone: Model A2001, A2003, and A2005. Exactly how these models will differ from one another is not entirely clear, but it's possible that these may have different storage sizes.

Another possibility may simply be alternate color styles. Currently, the Chinese manufacturer makes no distinction between storage types, so this may be more likely.

The additional model numbers were discovered as early as May when OnePlus scores began appearing on GFXBench. The most recent was model A2003, which supposedly includes 4 GB RAM and carries the moniker "Spring One A2003" on GFXBench to conceal its OnePlus origins. The benchmark database is also listing it with the Android 5.1.1 software.

Furthermore, intriguing sketches have emerged showing the possible final design of the OnePlus 2. Aside from its use of steel, the smartphone will reportedly have an 8 MP front-facing camera, subtly curved back, and dual rear cameras with a fingerprint sensor. However, it's worth noting that these concept drawings differ significantly from the recently leaked photos.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 07 > New data suggests up to three different OnePlus 2 models
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-07- 3 (Update: 2015-07- 3)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.