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New Motorola Xoom 2 model spotted with SIM slot, microSD reader

New Motorola Xoom 2 model spotted with SIM slot, microSD reader
New Motorola Xoom 2 model spotted with SIM slot, microSD reader
More Xoom 2 models with additional features may be on the way

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The Motorola Xoom 2 was announced just yesterday but was inconspicuously missing a couple of features – 3G/4G capabilities and a media card reader – that were built-in with the original Xoom.

According to The Inquirer, however, at least one more additional Xoom 2 model already exists with both features mentioned above. The leaked photo supposedly shows the 10.1-inch Xoom 2 model with a SIM card slot and a microSD reader. When the source asked Motorola why this particular model will not launch alongside the WiFi-only models, the spokesperson claimed that it was still in its pre-production phases.

There is no announcement for 3G models,” said Motorola to The Inquirer.

While it makes sense that models with SIM card capabilities would require additional testing, Motorola could have easily included the card reader in even the WiFi-only models instead of reserving it only for the SIM-enabled models.

Regardless, users should definitely expect 3G/4G models from Motorola in the future. The WiFi-only Xoom 2 and Xoom 2 Media Edition are still slated for a mid-November launch in the UK and Ireland.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2011 11 > New Motorola Xoom 2 model spotted with SIM slot, microSD reader
Allen Ngo, 2011-11- 4 (Update: 2012-05-26)
Allen Ngo

Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.