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New 10-inch PlayBook could launch before the end of the year

New 10-inch PlayBook could launch before the end of the year
New 10-inch PlayBook could launch before the end of the year
Rumor claims larger PlayBook model from RIM will be made to compete in the 10-inch tablet segment

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While the BlackBerry PlayBook launched here in the U.S. not too long ago, RIM could already be preparing another model of the PlayBook for a release around the holidays this year.

According to BGR, the website claims to have been tipped by multiple sources that RIM has another PlayBook up its sleeve. The rumored tablet will be larger in screen size at 10 inches compared to the 7-inch PlayBook. It is more likely than not, however, that the larger model would only be a variant of the current model and shouldn’t be thought of as the PlayBook 2.

As for the motive behind the possible 10-inch tablet, RIM could very well be looking to expand its presence with more offerings. Tablets around 10 inches are presently more common than ones that are 7-inches, so RIM could face stiff competition in the 10-inch category. The Apple iPad, Acer Iconia A500, Motorola Xoom, and upcoming Toshiba Regza are all examples of 9- or 10-inch tablets.

The current Wi-Fi PlayBook can be had for just under $500, although the much anticipated Android App Player is expected to come later this year.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2011 05 > New 10-inch PlayBook could launch before the end of the year
Allen Ngo, 2011-05- 5 (Update: 2012-05-26)
Allen Ngo

Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.