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10-inch RIM PlayBook may have already been sighted

10-inch RIM PlayBook may have already been sighted
10-inch RIM PlayBook may have already been sighted
The rumored 10-inch PlayBook spotted in action and will supposedly sport a significantly higher quality screen

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While it is extremely likely that RIM will eventually release a larger tablet under the PlayBook moniker, the device may already be in its late testing phases and closer to release than first expected.

According to an eagle-eyed CrackBerry editor, he claimed to have spotted the rumored 10-inch PlayBook during a long flight. As predicted, the larger model will reportedly be quite similar to the current 7-inch PlayBook, but with “visibly better screen image quality than the 7” unit, significantly better contrast, brightness and viewing angle.” The reporter stated that he saw a 7-inch unit being used along with the larger 10-inch version, and was thus able to make those screen quality claims.

A white 7-inch PlayBook could be in the works, too, according to the source.

As we wait for official announcements regarding the 10-inch PlayBook, let’s not forget about the rumored 4G 7-inch model as well, supposedly coming sometime this year for the Sprint network.

The current 7-inch RIM BlackBerry PlayBook Wi-Fi model is now available in most electronic stores for $499 in the U.S.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2011 05 > 10-inch RIM PlayBook may have already been sighted
Allen Ngo, 2011-05- 7 (Update: 2012-05-26)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.