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Motorola releases official Xoom and revenue numbers

Motorola releases official Xoom and revenue numbers
Motorola releases official Xoom and revenue numbers
Actual Xoom sales, while not entirely impressive, were also not as bad as some analysts expected

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While analysts had low expectations of the Xoom tablet, the actual sales numbers for the Android Honeycomb device were anybody’s guess. Fortunately, speculations can finally be put to rest as Motorola revealed its Q1 2011 earnings report this Friday, with decent Xoom performance numbers to boot.

According to the financial results report for Motorola Mobility, the cellular company confirmed 250,000 Xoom tablets shipped for its first quarter in market. Of course, units “shipped” does not necessarily translate to units “sold,” but 250k units is still a respectable number, especially since overall revenue for the quarter was at $3 billion, 22% higher than Q1 2010.

In the grand scheme of things, however, the tablet was but a small fraction of Motorola’s revenue. Of the 9.3 million Motorola devices shipped during Q1 2011, 4.1 million were smartphones, which was over 16 times the number of Xoom tablets. As tablets become more mainstream this year, we expect them to start leaving a larger mark on the company’s future financial results. Check out the full Motorola earnings report below.

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Allen Ngo, 2011-04-30 (Update: 2012-05-26)
Allen Ngo

Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.