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Motorola XT1650 smartphone spotted on Geekbench

Motorola XT1650 smartphone spotted on Geekbench
Motorola XT1650 smartphone spotted on Geekbench
Lenovo may be equipping the potential Moto X successor with a Snapdragon 820 SoC and up to 4 GB RAM.

Another dive into an Android benchmarking database has revealed more information on an upcoming Motorola smartphone. Listed as the XT1650, the unannounced device will supposedly carry a Snapdragon 820 SoC with 4 GB RAM, which suggests that it will be a successor to the current Moto X series. This particular series is being sold under the Motorola brand instead of Lenovo who acquired the American company back in 2014.

Whether or not the upcoming Motorola smartphone will carry different names around the world is unknown. The Moto X, for example, is sold under the name Moto X Pure in North America and Moto X Style in Europe. Furthermore, the Moto X Force in Europe launched as the Droid Turbo 2 in the U.S. through exclusive contracts with Verizon Wireless. The smartphone was marketed as having a shatterproof display.

The next Moto X device will almost certainly run Android 6.0 Marshmallow as the Droid Turbo 2 had its software update just recently earlier this month. Motorola may officially announce the next Moto X at an upcoming press event this coming June.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 04 > Motorola XT1650 smartphone spotted on Geekbench
Alexander Fagot/ Allen Ngo, 2016-04-29 (Update: 2016-04-29)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.