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More Samsung patents on foldable devices emerge

More Samsung patents on foldable devices emerge
More Samsung patents on foldable devices emerge
Concepts could be applied to future foldable Galaxy smartphones and tablets including the supposed "Galaxy X".

Patently Mobile publishes regularly on patent applications received by the USPTO (United States Patent and Trademark Office). As previously reported, Samsung holds a handful of patents on foldable devices and will no doubt unveil consumer-ready models sometime in the near future since early prototypes with flexible, foldable, rollable, or transparent OLED panels have already been revealed to the public.

According to the source, Samsung has recently filed an application for a possible foldable Galaxy smartphone. The concept art shows the clamshell phone being folded in half with a special port on the back for charging on a potential docking station. Its design is reminiscent to the older Nintendo Game Boy Advanced SP. Patently Mobile also suggests that the "Foldable Galaxy" can include an iris scanner.

Additional sketches show that Samsung may be working on foldable tablets with gesture-based controls. Like the current Galaxy Edge series, users may be able to launch apps and perform functions by swiping from the edges of the bezel or screen.

Other than Samsung, Lenovo recently teased a bendable smartphone and foldable tablet at Tech World 2016. The trend will likely continue through CES 2017.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 07 > More Samsung patents on foldable devices emerge
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-07- 9 (Update: 2016-07- 9)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.