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Logitech Slim Combo MK470 in hands-on review: Quiet, wireless keyboard-mouse set for mobile and stationary use

Teaser
We have a keyboard-mouse set for testing, the MK470 Slim Combo from Logitech. The set focuses on mobility and is therefore particularly thin, but is also supposed to be used on the desktop at home. Our hands-on test clarifies whether the MK470 can fully replace conventional keyboards and mice and is also the perfect companion for on the go.

The MK470 is a wireless mouse and keyboard set that connects to a laptop or desktop PC via a wireless USB receiver. Due to its thin and slim dimensions, it should not only be used at home, but also on the go, if the integrated laptop keyboard is not sufficient, for example because there is no numeric keypad or longer typing tasks are pending. We will reveal whether the set can fulfill these expectations in the following.

Design

The set is optionally offered in white or black, whereby the plastic cover on the keyboard's upper edge is colored gray in both color variants.

White (Image source: Logitech)
White (Image source: Logitech)
Gray (Image source: Logitech)
Gray (Image source: Logitech)

The keyboard

Battery and receiver compartment
Battery and receiver compartment

This shiny gray plastic rail is also what is most likely to offend some people visually, since it does not convey a particularly high-quality look, depending on taste. The rail can be removed, and underneath is the battery compartment for 2 AAA batteries or rechargeable batteries as well as a holder for the small wireless USB receiver. However, the latter can also be stored in the mouse.

Slightly tilted position, thin design
Slightly tilted position, thin design

The keyboard itself measures about 28 cm (~11 inches) without the NumPad and is about the same size as the keyboard of a 13-inch laptop, i.e. without the NumPad. The majority of the keyboard is very thin, only the upper edge is very thick. On the one hand, this opens up the aforementioned accommodations for the energy storage, and on the other hand, it ensures that the keyboard is somewhat tilted when typing.

Small arrow keys, rounded "corner" keys
Small arrow keys, rounded "corner" keys

The layout of the keyboard looks very tidy, and there is a numpad on the right side. The normal keys are about 1.6 x 1.6 cm (~0.63 x 0.63 in) and have a distance of about 3 mm to each other. For optical reasons, the corner keys are rounded just like the corners themselves, but this leads to unusually small size ratios especially in the upper, already reduced key row on the outer keys. This at least questionable design decision has also been implemented between the number pad and the rest of the keyboard, so for example the right arrow key feels different than the left arrow key due to its rounding in the lower, right corner. "entf" and "pos1" are also reduced in size again as a result.

The arrow keys are also reduced in size, measuring only 1.3 mm (~0.51 in) in width. The height of the up/down arrow keys is also halved, so they share an already reduced key field, which makes it very fiddly.

Apart from these restrictions, the layout is very clear. The usual special functions are implemented via F keys with the fn key.

The mouse

Removable hood
Removable hood

The mouse is rounded at all ends and measures about 10.6 to 10.7 cm (~4.17 to 4.21 in) at the central axis. In width, we measure about 5.8 cm (~2.3 in). On the bottom are two semicircular gliding feet and centrally an on/off switch and of course the optical sensor. The special thing, however, is the top. The very thin plastic cover with the "logi" lettering is easy to remove, because it is only held in place by three quite strong magnets in the back half, the front half consists of the two flexible buttons. We like the magnetic solution with the removable top cover. Under the cover is the compartment for the battery (1x AA), and there is also a small slot for the radio receiver.

Top
Top
Bottom
Bottom

The height of the mouse is somewhat unusual. While Bluetooth mice are often equipped with a strong surface curvature, the Logitech model is kept very flat.

The mouse wheel is almost unusually wide in view of the mouse's small dimensions, but it ensures smooth running.

Practical experience

Through Plug&Play, the set is super fast ready for use. After the batteries (or rechargeable batteries) are inserted, only the USB receiver has to be inserted into a free USB slot on the PC and the set is ready for use, the keyboard immediately, the mouse still has to be switched on below. Inputs were always recognized flawlessly by both devices.

The keyboard

The keys have a medium travel and a clear pressure point, which provides a good feedback. The stroke could be a bit longer, but overall, typing is pleasantly smooth and fast. The workflow can only falter a bit during corrections due to the greatly reduced and partially reshaped arrow and function keys (Pos1, Del, etc.). Here, the fingers still search a bit for the right grips in the beginning. Otherwise, the typing feel is quite pleasant. The typing volume is all right overall, only the space bar is noticeably louder than the rest.

Many months of runtime without changing the battery (Image source: Logitech)
Many months of runtime without changing the battery (Image source: Logitech)

The set does not have a backlight, so the MK470 is less suitable for working in dark environments. On the other hand, the backlight does not affect the battery life, which we cannot say too much about due to the short test period. According to Logitech, the keyboard's runtime should be up to 36 months depending on use, and the mouse should last for 18 months. Both devices automatically switch to sleep mode when not in use to save energy.

Incidentally, this article was written on said keyboard with the help of the accompanying mouse, which felt pretty good at first. Of course, the thin keyboard does not have the soft stroke of a normal, stationary keyboard, the typing feel is more reminiscent of that on a notebook with a mid-range keyboard. In the long run, however, the keyboard could turn out to be a bit too small, so that especially the wrists tire faster than with larger, stationary keyboards due to the slight bending posture in the long run. Although the keyboard was similar in size to our notebook, the first signs of wrist fatigue were felt to set in a bit faster on the MK470 keyboard.

The mouse

From bottom to top: Noname Bluetooth mouse, Logitech MK470, worn-out classic MX518
From bottom to top: Noname Bluetooth mouse, Logitech MK470, worn-out classic MX518

When using the mouse for the first time, you first notice the flat surface, which makes the model nestle less in the palm of the hand than mice with an upward curved surface. In direct comparison, it seems as if the hand cannot rest quite as comfortably on the mouse; the hand always has to be "held" itself. Therefore, the mouse isn't moved very much with the inner surface, but mostly by the fingers on the sides and the thumb. Due to the inserted AA-battery, the otherwise light plastic mouse does add a bit of weight to the mouse pad, but the mouse is still quite light overall, which makes it react a bit more sensitively than some other models. This can make especially quiet and precise control tasks a bit more complicated, and the mouse pointer jumps off a bit faster than in heavier models.

Logitech advertises the mouse having low noise development, which we can fully confirm. Both the wheel (if you don't turn it up too fast) and the click noises are pleasantly quiet and barely perceptible. However, this is also realized by a very low pressure travel on the keys, which seems very sensitive and a bit unusual at first. However, the feedback is still sufficient and does not feel spongy at all, but crisp and tight in stroke.

Verdict

The MK470 Combo Slim, provided by Logitech
The MK470 Combo Slim, provided by Logitech

The thin, wireless keyboard-mouse set MK470 Slim Combo costs around 50 Euros (~$59) at Logitech. For that, you get a quite portable set that is a kind of compromise solution between higher-quality stationary devices and thin, mobile input devices. The quick readiness for use and the long battery life are especially positive. The magnetic holder for the mouse cover is also an interesting solution. Working with it is initially quite successful, the input feedback is well noticeable, but in the long run, the dimensions of both devices might be a bit too small for comfortable working in the long run.

The Logitech Slim Combo MK470 is a solid keyboard-mouse set that can easily be taken along if necessary. However, the set is only suitable for long-term use to a limited extent due to the small dimensions.

Prices

While Logitech itself charges 49.99 Euros for both color variations of the set on its website, as mentioned, the "street prices" are already lower. For example, the gray color variant only costs $36.46 on Amazon, while the classier-looking white costs $37.55.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > Reviews > Logitech Slim Combo MK470 in hands-on review: Quiet, wireless keyboard-mouse set for mobile and stationary use
Christian Hintze, 2021-03-29 (Update: 2021-03-29)