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LG announces Xnote Z330 Ultrabook

LG announces Xnote Z330 Ultrabook
LG announces Xnote Z330 Ultrabook
The 13.3-inch Ultrabook is expected to be one of the thinnest notebooks around, even beating out the MacBook Air

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Add LG to the ever-growing list of Ultrabook manufacturers as the South Korean conglomerate has just announced its first Ultrabook offering.

Called the Xnote Z330, the 13.3-inch notebook will reportedly measure just 0.5787-inches (14.7mm) thick with a weight of just 2.7 pounds (1.22kg). By comparison, the 13.3-inch 2011 MacBook Air is about 0.68-inches (17mm) thick and 2.96 pounds (1.34kg), so the new Xnote will have bragging rights as one of the thinnest ultrathin notebooks when it launches in South Korea later this month.

In terms of the Ultrabook’s innards, the LG will pack a 1366x768 resolution screen, Core i5-2467M or Core i7-2637M CPU with integrated Intel HD 3000 GPU, 4GB RAM and SATA III SSD up to 256GB. Connectivity options include HDMI, Intel WiDi, Bluetooth 3.0, USB 3.0 and a microSD card reader.

Unfortunately, the press release does not appear to mention a North American or European launch, so users outside of South Korea may have to wait a bit longer. The notebook is expected to start at the USD equivalent of $1509. We will update with official international release dates once they become available.

Check out the Korean press release at the source below.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2011 12 > LG announces Xnote Z330 Ultrabook
Allen Ngo, 2011-12- 7 (Update: 2012-05-26)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.