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Hexa-core Ryzen CPUs could be unlikely

Hexa-core Ryzen CPUs could be unlikely
Hexa-core Ryzen CPUs could be unlikely
AMD may be skipping hexa-core processors in favor of watered-down octa-core configurations for the mainstream lineup instead.

Towards the end of 2016, French publication Canard PC reported that AMD may have been planning hexa-core Ryzen processors for a 2017 launch. Now, Thai website Zolkorn is refuting these claims saying that AMD will not be releasing any hexa-core Ryzen CPUs for the mainstream market. Instead, AMD will be launching quad-core and octa-core variants without the equivalent Hyper-Threading technology in its place.

Furthermore, the previously known SR3, SR5, and SR7 model abbreviations are believed to be referring to entry-level quad-core CPUs with Hyper-Threading, mainstream octa-core CPUs without Hyper-Threading, and enthusiast-level octa-core CPUs with Hyper-Threading, respectively. These are still rumors for now and continue to be just speculation based on the single source.

AMD is hoping to make a comeback in the desktop space with the upcoming launch of Ryzen and the overarching Zen architecture. Leaked benchmarks show a supposedly high-end Ryzen CPU rivaling the expensive Core i7-6800K. The new Zen and Vega announcements should give AMD the performance boosts it needs in the processor and GPU markets against Intel and Nvidia, respectively.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 01 > Hexa-core Ryzen CPUs could be unlikely
Allen Ngo, 2017-01-31 (Update: 2017-01-31)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.