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Google Chrome 55 stops Flash on PCs and introduces offline features on Android

Chrome 55 defaults to HTML on the desktop and introduces offline features on Android.
Chrome 55 defaults to HTML on the desktop and introduces offline features on Android.
Google is continuing to kill Adobe Flash on Windows, macOS and Linux by defaulting to HTML5 on the new version of Chrome rolling out to desktops already. An update for Chrome on Android will allow users to download websites for offline viewing.
Alexander Fagot,

Back in June of this year, Google announced that they will enhance security and speed of their desktop browser Chrome by blocking Flash content from loading by the end of the year. Starting with Chrome 53, the Chrome team stopped Flash background-content from loading. Now with Chrome 55, they continue on that path by defaulting to HTML5 content with two exceptions: The top 10 sites on the internet containing Flash content will be exempted for a year. Those are sites like Facebook, Youtube, Yahoo, Twitch, Amazon, Live.com and a few popular Russian sites. Also sites, that only offer Flash content are exempted as well.

According to Google this will lead to faster load times and more security for users. On the Android side of things, Chrome 55 will introduce a new offline feature, allowing Android users to download websites, videos and images and later read and watch them offline. While the Windows, Linux and macOS version of Chrome 55 is already available, the Android version is expected to be released shortly.

Quelle(n)

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 12 > Google Chrome 55 stops Flash on PCs and introduces offline features on Android
Alexander Fagot, 2016-12- 4 (Update: 2016-12- 4)
Alexander Fagot
Alexander Fagot - Managing Editor News
As a former projectionist still used to working with 35 mm film and experience in computer assembling and overclocking, I was drawn to the professional IT crowd a couple of years back and started working in IT support, Windows administration and project management before discovering my love for traveling the world. Now I am working as a news editor from all parts of the world, mostly writing about gadgets and mobile gear for Notebookcheck.