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Fujitsu announces Stylistic R726 2-in-1 convertible

Fujitsu announces Stylistic R726 2-in-1 convertible
Fujitsu announces Stylistic R726 2-in-1 convertible
The 12.5-inch business-centric R726 will be available this February 2016 with Skylake processor options.

The Stylistic R726 2-in-1 will be available early next year through resellers and directly from Fujitsu. Prices and specific SKUs, however, have not yet been announced by the manufacturer.

The magnesium-aluminum R726 can be equipped with a Core i3-6100U, i5-6200U, or up to a Core i7 Skylake CPU. More options are expected to be available by the time the model launches. Graphics will likely be limited to the HD Graphics 520 and RAM up to a maximum of 4 GB LPDDR3-1600.

Other features include 4G LTE, disk encryption, TPM, NFC, and Smart Card. Storage sizes range from 128 GB up to 512 GB via a M.2 SSD. Windows 10 Pro will come pre-installed.

The 12.5-inch PLS touchscreen will be available in glossy or matte, which is rare for a tablet. The resolution will be fixed at 1080p with a rated brightness of up to 400 cd/m2 and a contrast ratio of 700:1. Its 10-point capacitive touchscreen includes a stylus as well.

The unit will measure 319 x 201 x 9.5 mm and will be available in both WiFi-only and UMTS/LTE-enabled SKUs. Gigabit LAN, HDMI, and VGA are available only as adapters. Local ports include full-size USB 3.0, mDP, and 3.5 mm combo audio with Bluetooth 4.1 LE. The rear and front cameras will be 5 MP and 2 MP, respectively, and its 4-cell battery will be rated at 34 Wh. Unfortunately, the detachable includes no USB Type-C.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 11 > Fujitsu announces Stylistic R726 2-in-1 convertible
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-11-18 (Update: 2015-11-18)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.