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Dual-boot ViewSonic ViewPad 10 finally sees a release, priced at $599

Dual-boot ViewSonic ViewPad 10 finally sees a release, priced at $599
Dual-boot ViewSonic ViewPad 10 finally sees a release, priced at $599
New tablet should be available immediately with dual-boot capabilities between Android and Windows

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ViewSonic announced in a press release this week the availability and price of its new ViewPad 10. Announced last November, the ViewPad 10 will have the unique ability to dual-boot Google Android 1.6 and Windows 7 Home Premium.

Expected retail price of the new tablet starts at $599 for the 16GB SSD model while the $679 model will double the storage capacity and include Windows 7 Professional instead of Home Premium.

Android 1.6 (Donut) is almost 2 years outdated as of this writing. Whether or not the tablet will be upgradeable to Gingerbread or even Froyo is not mentioned at all in the press release. Hopefully, ViewSonic will jump in on the issue soon after release, or else the company would risk being overshadowed by other similarly priced and more up-to-date tablets.

A similar tablet called the ViewPad 10pro made a debut last month at the MWC. The “pro” version will reportedly come pre-loaded with an Atom Oak Trail processor, Android 2.2, and HDMI.

The 10.1-inch ViewPad 10 will sport a 1024x600 resolution screen, an Intel Atom 1.66GHz single-core processor, 2GB DDR3 RAM, integrated SD card slot and a 1.3MP front-facing camera. Check the full press release below.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2011 03 > Dual-boot ViewSonic ViewPad 10 finally sees a release, priced at $599
Allen Ngo, 2011-03- 9 (Update: 2012-05-26)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.