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Android 6.0 steadily creeping up in usage statistics

Android 6.0 steadily creeping up in usage statistics
Android 6.0 steadily creeping up in usage statistics
The latest major Android release now makes up 0.3 percent of active Android users.

Google Dashboard collects data from all Android devices that have accessed the Play Store and publishes statistics based on set 7-day intervals. During the period ending November 2nd, Google estimates that 0.3 percent of all Android devices are running Android 6.0 Marshmallow.

Android 5.0 and 5.1 Lollipop now make up 25.6 percent of Android devices compared to 23.5 percent during the same period last month. The Dashboard also reveals that Android 5.0 makes up 15.5 percent while Android 5.1 makes up the other 10.1 percent. Android 4.4 KitKat has fallen from 38.9 percent the previous month to 37.8 percent for this latest weekly statistic.

Android 4.1 to 4.3 Jelly Bean have also fallen slightly from 30.2 percent to 29 percent. A more detailed breakdown reveals that 13.9 percent are using version 4.2.x compared to 14.5 percent a month earlier, 11 percent are on 4.1.x compared to 11.4 percent a month earlier, and 4.1 percent are running Android 4.3 compare to 4.3 percent a month earlier.

Looking further down the line reveals that 3.3 percent of Android users are still using 4.0.3 to 4.0.4 Ice Cream Sandwich compared to 3.4 percent a month earlier. Android 2.3.3 to 2.3.7 Gingerbread follows next at 3.8 percent and Froyo is last at only 0.2 percent.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 11 > Android 6.0 steadily creeping up in usage statistics
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-11- 9 (Update: 2015-11- 9)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.