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AMD quietly adds then removes adware from its latest Radeon drivers

AMD quietly adds then removes adware from its latest Radeon drivers
AMD quietly adds then removes adware from its latest Radeon drivers
AMD owners may have noticed a new desktop icon advertising Bethesda's upcoming title after installing Radeon driver 17.4.4. The chipmaker has since apologized after user complaints of the unnecessary stealth advert.

AMD is in the midst of a possible resurgence in the PC market with its Ryzen family of CPUs and so any missteps could be quite detrimental to the chipmaker. The latest blunder involves the newest Radeon 17.4.4 graphics driver that, when installed, will automatically add an icon on the user's desktop for the upcoming game Quake Champions from developer Bethesda. Launching this link will bring the user to a sign-up page for an open beta program and the user's location may even be tracked.

AMD fans are understandably upset as the driver provides no pre-warning or user consent for the desktop icon. Anger erupted through social media and Twitter before an official AMD response was made. According to PCWorld, AMD has apologized for the "inconvenience" and will continue working closely with Bethesda to bring Quake Champions first to Radeon users. The company also revealed that it is not receiving any monetary compensation for including the desktop icon and that the link will be removed in a revised version of the 17.4.4 driver.

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Source(s)

Text: pcworld.com

Source: AMD

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 04 > AMD quietly adds then removes adware from its latest Radeon drivers
Allen Ngo, 2017-04-30 (Update: 2017-04-30)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.