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Samsung refreshes Galaxy A8 with Exynos 5433 SoC

Samsung refreshes Galaxy A8 with Exynos 5433 SoC
Samsung refreshes Galaxy A8 with Exynos 5433 SoC
The Japan-only smartphone will be a variant of the current Galaxy A8 with a faster Exynos processor.

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Samsung launched the LTE-enabled Galaxy A8 back in July with a FHD display, metal frame, a weight of 151 grams, and a thickness of just 6 mm with Gold, Black, and White color options. Now the South Korean giant is ready to launch an improved model just months after its initial SKU.

The first Galaxy A8 shipped with either a Snapdragon 615 SoC or Exynos 5430 SoC depending on the region. The newer Galaxy A8, however, will switch over to the newer and faster octa-core Exynos 5433 (Exynos 7 Octa) SoC for the Japanese market. The same SoC can be found on the current Galaxy Tab S2 8.0 and 9.7 tablets.

The Samsung processor consists of four ARM Cortex-A57 cores at 1.9 GHz and four additional ARM Cortex-A53 cores at 1.3 GHz with an integrated Mali-T760 MP6 GPU. Otherwise, the rest of the hardware remains unchanged including the 5.7-inch Super AMOLED display, 2 GB RAM, 16 MP rear and 5 MP front cameras, and 3050 mAh battery.

It is currently unknown if Samsung will launch the refreshed Galaxy A8 overseas. The smartphone will be exclusive to Japan for the time being.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 12 > Samsung refreshes Galaxy A8 with Exynos 5433 SoC
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-12- 9 (Update: 2015-12- 9)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.