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New flagship from Doogee to rival LG Flex series

New flagship from Doogee to rival LG Flex series
New flagship from Doogee to rival LG Flex series
A confident source close to Notebookcheck claims Doogee will soon launch a metal smartphone with curved display

Our source can say with certainty that the new Doogee flagship will have a 5-inch display, though the resolution is still unclear. It could be to HD, Full HD or Quad-HD. In any case, the 2.5D display will be manufactured by LG, so the display should be similar to the LG G Flex 2. The processor is expected to be a MediaTek MT6753, which is a new Octa-core chip of with eight cores each clocked at 1.5 GHz. It also includes an integrated Mali-T720 GPU.

The smartphone will offer either 2 GB, 3 GB or 4 GB of RAM with a battery capacity of 2,500 mAh, 3150 mAh or 4000 mAh. The frame and battery cover should be made of metal and glass, respectively. As a special feature, our source cited a unique feature for voice control. The smartphone will be able to open any app with a verbal command from standby mode. The camera sensor will be either a Sony MX214 or Isocell sensor from Samsung is used.

Doogee smartphones are available via the official website and various third-party resellers in Germany. The source of this leak is close to Notebookcheck and we report with high confidence, including the first teaser image below. We expect more information to come in the following days.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 05 > New flagship from Doogee to rival LG Flex series
Andreas Müller, 2015-05-28 (Update: 2015-05-28)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.