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Microsoft designs method to emulate touch input on non-touch displays

Microsoft's method for allowing touch input emulation on a non-touch display (Source: Patent Scope).
Microsoft's method for allowing touch input emulation on a non-touch display (Source: Patent Scope).
While Windows supports touch displays, many laptops are still released without touch and support on desktops is rare outside of some AiO devices. Microsoft has now patented a process for supporting touch input on devices with traditional display panels.

While touchscreens are becoming more common on windows devices, there are still a large number of non-touch laptops released, and touch on desktop PCs is scarce. This is a hindrance when interacting with software that requires touch input for some functionality. An example is trying to digitally sign a document, necessitating the transfer of that file to your phone to sign, or scanning/photographing a physical copy of your signature.

Microsoft has patented a method for handling touch ability on non-touch displays. It describes using two fingers on a laptop touchpad to position a similarly sized input box on the screen. Once in place, the touchpad will register any single finger actions as a simulated touch input in the same relative location within the touch zone.

The patent description also includes reference to using a smartphone as the touch surface. There are scenarios where users would just interact with files etc directly on their phone, but this would give flexibility to still use this feature while on a desktop without a touchpad.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 08 > Microsoft designs method to emulate touch input on non-touch displays
Craig Ward, 2020-08-16 (Update: 2020-08-16)
Craig Ward
Craig Ward - News Editor
I grew up in a family surrounded by technology, starting with my father loading up games for me on a Commodore 64, and later on a 486. In the late 90's and early 00's I started learning how to tinker with Windows, while also playing around with Linux distributions, both of which gave me an interest for learning how to make software do what you want it to do, and modifying settings that aren't normally user accessible. After this I started building my own computers, and tearing laptops apart, which gave me an insight into hardware and how it works in a complete system. Now keeping up with the latest in hardware and software news is a passion of mine.