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Microsoft denies future tablets running Windows Phone 7 OS

Microsoft denies future tablets running Windows Phone 7 OS
Microsoft denies future tablets running Windows Phone 7 OS
The Windows Phone 7 operating system will not be expanding to tablets anytime soon

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During a Worldwide Partners Conference, Microsoft Windows Phone President Andy Lees reaffirmed the company’s view of releasing tablets running Windows Phone 7 OS.

According to Lees, Microsoft views the tablet as a PC and thus a Windows Phone 7 OS would not be the next rational move in the tablet market. A phone OS for tablets would therefore be “in conflict” with attempting to offer a PC-level experience for tablets.

As such, Windows 8 may be the only tablet-native OS coming from Microsoft in the near future. Lees expects the operating system to support system on chips (SoCs) to better expand its range of compatible processors.

Additionally, Lees sees a future where PCs, tablets and phones will eventually merge into a “unified ecosystem.” AppleInsider therefore suspects that the Windows Phone 7 OS will eventually be replaced completely by the more flexible Windows 8.

The Windows Phone 7 operating system will likely be restricted to smartphones for now, meaning Microsoft may not be announcing anything huge for the tablet market until at least the release of Windows 8. So far, Microsoft’s current presence in tablets is largely limited to Windows 7, which is generally not optimized for multi-touch use or gesture-based commands.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2011 07 > Microsoft denies future tablets running Windows Phone 7 OS
Allen Ngo, 2011-07-13 (Update: 2012-05-26)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.